Boomeresque:Definition
1. Adj.: Describing a person born between 1 Jan. 1946 and 31 Dec. 1964
2. Adj.: Description of a person, place or thing possessing Baby Boomer je ne sais quoi
3. See also, Boomer, Esq.: A Baby Boomer who is also a licensed attorney (See, e.g., About).

Singapore Selfie (A Visit to Singapore)

by Suzanne Fluhr on June 7, 2014 · 70 comments

Singapore mapOur month long trip to Southeast Asia, started in Chiang Mai, Thailand and ended in the city/country/island of Singapore. (Yes, Singapore is all those things). Arriving on the Azamara Journey after a 13 day cruise, we allotted two full days for our Singapore sojourn.

Although Singapore has a population of 5.13 million (2012), Singapore is the antithesis of the chaotic, teeming, sometimes smelly and less than spotless large cities in the rest of Asia, and indeed, in the world. If you want Asia to be easy to navigate, full of superb English speakers, with excellent medical care and safe drinking water from the tap, Singapore is for you. English is one of the four national languages (the others are Mandarin, Malay and Tamil), but English is the first language of instruction in schools and is the lingua franca of the society.

Singapore cityscape

Singapore cityscape

Singaporeans are all about following the rules such that civil society is very well-ordered. It is not an urban legend that you cannot buy/sell chewing gum in Singapore without a prescription. Whereas jaywalking is an art form in many world cities, do NOT jaywalk in Singapore. Even if you aren’t fined, you will get the stink eye from law abiding Singaporeans.

Singapore’s streets are not congested with traffic. As in London, one pays for the privilege of driving into the city at certain times and the government has purposely made owning a car cost prohibitive for even many middle class families through taxation. The populace has been rewarded with a world class public transportation system and taxis are widely available in the central business district.

We started our visit to Singapore as we often do when visiting a metropolis that is new to us, by taking a “hop on –  hop off” bus tour of the city. We usually “hop off” at sites beyond walking distance from our hotel. In Singapore, our comfortable walking distance was somewhat lessened by the oppressive (for us) heat and humidity. Located at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, Singapore is only 85 miles north of the equator with average daily high temperatures over 85 degrees Fahrenheit year round — and it’s not a dry heat.

Singapore Botanic Gardens

Singapore Botanic Gardens

Singapore Botanic Garden

The Singapore Botanic Gardens is lush with tropical foliage

Our first “hop off” was at the Singapore Botanic Gardens which now ranks as one of our favorites. Even though we are horticulturally challenged in terms of keeping our own plants alive, we easily spent two hours roaming the 74 hectare site. (For us non-metric types, a hectare is equal to 2.471 acres).  Admission to the garden is free and it is open daily from 5:00 a.m. to midnight. It was clear that it is popular with Singaporeans and their canine companions. The site is beautifully tended with different sections, including one dedicated to the natural rain forest, a ginger garden and the National Orchid Garden for which there is a small admission charge. The Garden is also sprinkled with water features and sculpture. Orchid Garden at the Singapore Botanic Gardens

 

 

Marina Bay Sands Hotel topped by a Sky Garden

Marina Bay Sands Hotel topped by a Sky Garden

We probably should have skipped our second hop off which was at the Marina Bay Sands SkyPark complex because we are cheap frugal. In addition to a luxury shopping mall, casino and convention center, the Marina Bay Sands complex, opened in 2010, has three massive 57 story hotel towers, topped by an open air sky garden with a very scary cool looking infinity pool, bars and eating venues. We did a lot of walking to find the ticket office where we learned that it costs 23 Singapore dollars ($18.38 US) to take the elevator to the observation deck. That was a little too steep for us for an elevator ride. However, of the 3,026 TripAdvisor reviews, 1,568 rated it “excellent” and 936 “very good”, so apparently we are in the minority. (Don’t bring your bathing suit. Only hotel guests are allowed in the pool).

The National Museum of Singapore built in when Singapore was still a British colony.

The National Museum of Singapore built in 1882 when Singapore was still a British colony.

The National Museum of Singapore was within walking distance of our hotel in the central business district. In our opinion, it is well worth a visit of two to three hours. The museum is located in a veddy British colonial style building constructed in 1882. It is open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. with a $10 S ($8 USD) admission fee which includes an audio guide to the very well curated Singapore History Gallery (only open until 6:00 p.m.). The visitor is given the option of two “paths” through the history gallery, one from an “official” perspective and the other as told through the lives of individuals. One can cross paths at various points. After learning about, in considerable detail, the devastation and brutalization Singapore experienced during capture and occupation by the Japanese military during World War II, Singapore’s post war rise and renaissance as an Asian economic powerhouse is truly remarkable. The Museum also has a Singapore Living Gallery which showcases the lives (including cuisines) of the various ethnic groups that are part of Singaporean society.

A street in Singapore's Chinatown decorated for the Chinese New Year

A street in Singapore’s Chinatown decorated for the Chinese New Year

Singapore is full of glitzy and architecturally interesting office buildings (not necessarily the same thing), hotels and shopping malls (Orchard Road is the most famous); however, there are also clearly defined areas for the traditional cultures that comprise Singaporean society: Chinatown, Little India and Kampong Glam (Malays and other Muslim groups). Singapore prides itself on being multi-cultural—although in reality it is perhaps more of a patchwork than a melting pot.

Singapore selfie with local blogger, Jacklynn Seah

My Singapore selfie with local blogger, Jaclynn Seah

Our careers resulted in us both having the opportunity to commune with some locals. Mr./Dr. Excitement presented a lecture at the Singapore National University Hospital, while I enjoyed a food court lunch (and Q. and A. fest) with Jaclynn Seah of The Occasional Traveller blog. As usual, these meet-ups provided additional insights into Singaporean life and culture — not to mention that without Jaclynn’s recommendation, it is unlikely that Mr. and Mrs. Excitement would have made our way to the highest outside roof bar in the world, Altitude, at Raffles Place from which we toasted the last night of our Asian adventure with a Singapore Sling, a live band and fabulous views.

Singapore Sling at the Altitude Bar atop Raffles Place

Last night Singapore Sling at the Altitude Bar atop Raffles Place

Where we stayed: This being a work financed stop for us, we stayed at the Fairmount Hotel in the Central Business District. Our room was comfortable with a nice city view. I was particularly taken by the bedside control panel from which one could operate pretty much everything in the room—lights, curtains, air conditioning, alarm clock. The Fairmount Singapore Hotel is one of several hotels, including the historic Raffles Hotel, clustered in the same area and connected by underground access to a large indoor shopping mall and a metro stop. This group of hotels is a 20 minute taxi ride from  the top ranked Changi Airport. (Tip: If you join the complimentary Fairmount President’s Club, you are eligible for free high speed wifi and use of the fitness center.)

Where we ate: For dinner our first two nights in Singapore, Mr. and Mrs. Excitement did not wander from the block where the Fairmount Hotel is located and found ourselves at a fairly authentic German restaurant and a Spanish tapas restaurant — both good, but admittedly, somewhat strange choices for visitors to an Asian city. For our final dinner, again, thanks to Jaclynn, we crossed the Singapore River to Boat Quay which has a good collection of all types of restaurants with both indoor dining and outdoor riverside seating. Continuing our United Nations eating pattern, we settled on a Middle Eastern restaurant.

Should you go?: For us, Singapore was a good last stop to ease back into “Western” life and culture. It is a world class Asian city, but with a heavy dose of British efficiency, civility and administration. It even has the Singapore Flyer, Singapore’s version of the London Eye observation wheel.

The view of Singapore at night from the Altitude Bar at Raffles Place

The view of Singapore at night from the Altitude Bar at Raffles Place

Have you ever been to Singapore? If so, what did you like best? If not, do you think you would want to visit there?

{ 67 comments… read them below or add one }

Catherine June 7, 2014 at 8:01 pm

I really like this idea of starting out in a new city by getting on a hop-on hop-off bus – great way to see the sights!

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Jackie Humphries Smith June 8, 2014 at 12:33 am

Oh, such memories of Singapore – now a couple of decades ago in the history books. Our memory was of a sterile – beyond clean – city where littering was a crime and signs warmed of dire consequences should you be caught doing so. It was so clean that it was almost scary. Fun trip down memory lane you’ve provided in this post.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 1:51 pm

I don’t know, Jackie. A clean city could grow on me. The Japanese cities are also very clean. (No public eating while walking around—by concensus, it seems). I think the local government started out with somewhat draconian fines for anti-social behavior, but now I think Singaporeans are motivated by pride of their city. Having said this, both the Japanese cities and Singapore have fairly authoritarian (although democratically elected) governments. I think it may also have something to do with rebuilding out of ashes and in Singapore’s case, there was also considerable unrest until the late 60’s.

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Jackie Humphries Smith June 9, 2014 at 11:37 am

I remember those signs posted all over with dire warnings of fines and imprisonment type punishments for littering and such. . .seems one even addressed disposal of chewed gum!

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Kristin Henning June 8, 2014 at 2:36 am

I’m impressed by the hours of the botanical garden, and by the two tour options in the museum. Our brief stay in Singapore was out on the island. Really nice, but we never even venTured downtown.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 1:52 pm

Kristin, if you never made it downtown, you missed a lot of what Singapore is about, so a return visit is definitely warranted.

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Donna Janke June 8, 2014 at 8:13 am

I haven’t been to Singapore. You make it sound very interesting. The botanical garden looks beautiful. And I like the idea of two paths through a museum. Even better, the idea of crossing paths. History varies depending on the perspective from which it is told.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 1:53 pm

Donna, the history gallery in the National Musem of Singapore was done very effectively and compellingly.

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Jacqueline Gum (Jacquie) June 8, 2014 at 9:01 am

Yes I have been to Singapore, though it was many years ago and it was part of an exhibition for my industry. I was able to sneak out to the Botanical gardens and had some memorable food there, but I would say that it isn’t a place I would re-visit simply because it is so pristine! Ha! It saddened me to see that they have basically demolished so much of their culture and replaced it with something that felt not quite authentic…but that is merely my opinion. As a friend of mine is fond of saying…I’m happy to have an opportunity for which I now have an opinion 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 2:07 pm

I’ll have to remember your friend’s saying. 😉 Singapore didn’t have to destroy all that much of their culture/architecture (I don’t think). First the British and then the Japanese took care of that. In fact, if anything, they’ve tried to preserve ethnic areas which would be worth a lot of money if used for sky scrapers.

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Dyanne@TravelnLass June 8, 2014 at 9:32 am

Most detailed and informative review, my dear! I couchsurfed in Singapore en route from Oz back to Vietnam, and my host took me (at my request) to one the “Hawkers” street food markets so I could sample the legendary “Chili Crab”. Oh my!

And yes, the Changi airport (I believe it’s been voted the best in the entire world!). Another great tip for your readers: the airport’s in transit complex offers free movies, snooze lounges, several different gardens (incl. the “Butterfly Garden” where I once found a geocache!), and best of all… on long layovers, you can take a FREE city bus tour (either day or a night tour) whereby airport personnel handle all the passport security details so you can leave the airport and return to the transit area w/o going through the usual security rigmarole.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 2:08 pm

Dyanne, thanks for this great additional information about Changi Airport. We should have spent more time there.

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Neva @ Retire for the Fun of it June 8, 2014 at 10:19 am

You gave such an interesting and complete overview of your stay in Singapore, I feel like you are my Rick Steves contact now. It sounds like a love/hate place to visit, but your travel blog friend made the trip special with her recommendations of places like the highest outside bar in the city for a relaxing drink.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 2:12 pm

Neva—I am totally flattered that you referred to me and Rick Steves in the same sentence. He is my go-to source for Europe trip planning (I just bought his books on Vienna and Budapest). (One way to identify Americans in Europe is if they are clutching a Rick Steve’s guidebook and have a Canadian flag on their backpack (just kidding—sort of). Just the other day, I told my husband that I wished Rick Steves would branch out with guides to other parts of the world—although perhaps one of the reasons his guides are so good is that he only does them for places with which he is personally familiar.

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Liz June 8, 2014 at 11:19 am

Suzanne, what did you think of the Azamara Journey? We’re scheduled to sail on it next year, and we’ve never been on that cruise line.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 12:09 pm

In a nut shell–we liked it. Stay tuned. Cruise blog post coming soon. Which itinerary are you doing?

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Mike June 8, 2014 at 12:34 pm

This is so awesome and love the selfie, Suzanne! True story – I fell in love with Singapore via an Anthony Bourdain one hour tv show he hosted there. The show depicted it just as you wrote above! There is low crime and no virtually on street suggestion. I was fascinated the part of the street food there. You mentioned the restaurants – did you try any street food? Singapore is huge on my bucket list despite Southeast Asia not being overall. Just not a fan of hot and humidity like they have there. I have a buddy at work who has girlfriend there and he has visited. He said it is absolutely amazing. And I do want to stay at the Marina Bay Sands despite the astronomical cost – even if only for a night 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 2:14 pm

We didn’t have a chance to try street food (I wish we had allotted more time for Singapore). Of all the places in Asia, Singapore is probably the safest place to eat street food—-washed down with tap water.

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Tim June 8, 2014 at 1:16 pm

Singapore is certainly an anomaly in Asia. I am sure other Asian cities resent Singapore as the “Perfect One”. I agree with you that it is a good transition city back to the west rather than an entry point or full on destination. Sounds like you guys had a great time. I remember Orchard Road from my first visit to Singapore as a kid back in 1980.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 8, 2014 at 2:16 pm

Tim, funny you should mention resentment. Malaysia unanimously kicked Singapore out of the Malay Federation in 1963 because they saw it as a competitor to their capital, Kuala Lumpur. I wonder if they regret doing that now.

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Patti June 8, 2014 at 9:27 pm

That view from the Altitude bar is spectacular, but I would never see it. Wicked fear of heights don’t ya know? Nor, would I ever pay the $18.38 to see the view from the top of the Marina Hotel. Abi would go and then tell me all about it. I knew about the chewing gum thing, but I didn’t realize you had to have a prescription. How does one get a prescription for chewing gum? Is it medical? No chewing gum for pleasure?

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 9, 2014 at 9:38 am

Chewing gum prescription would most likely be for smoking cessation—I would think.

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Leslie in Portland, Oregon June 9, 2014 at 1:42 am

Thank you for updating me about visiting Singapore. After being there many years ago, Singapore became least favorite Asian city because of the heat and humidity and the rigid enforcement of (and harsh penalties for breaking) rules. I’m glad to hear that that enforcement may have relaxed a bit. What I liked best was staying at the Raffles Hotel and spending time in lush gardens. I doubt that I’ll return to Singapore, except possibly while in transit. I will travel on Singapore Airlines, however, every time I get a chance!!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 9, 2014 at 1:44 pm

Leslie—it is hot, to be sure, but there are plenty of opportunities to duck into air conditioning. I didn’t find the rules so draconian—-but I’m a lawyer, so I’m all about the rules 😉

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Leslie in Portland, Oregon June 9, 2014 at 3:55 pm

I am a lawyer, too, Suzanne, which is a big part of why I so appreciate freedom.

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Paul Graham June 9, 2014 at 7:14 am

Hi Suzanne, Singapore has its charms though I would probably only return for business. I have friends who now live there after a long posting in Hong Kong. Initially they were not thrilled with the prospect of the transfer but now absolutely love it. I do like the fact that the National Museum a lot less than the elevator and it would certainly get my vote !

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 9, 2014 at 1:45 pm

I think Singapore might be one of those places where it’s more satisfying to live than to return again and again for visits, although I wish we had spent more time there.

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Elizabeth June 9, 2014 at 11:24 am

It looks lovely… a large city though!

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Irene S. Levine June 9, 2014 at 11:28 am

What a great overview of the city! But now can you explain the choice of cuisine???

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 9, 2014 at 6:55 pm

After a month in Asia, Asian food was getting kind of old for us. There’s that and the embarrassing issue of not being able to eat spicy food—-certainly not a problem with German food 😉

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wendy June 9, 2014 at 12:14 pm

Thank you for sharing your experiences in Singapore! Although I no longer live in Asia (26 years in HK, which is dirty, smelly and exciting beyond belief!), I enjoy reading about other people’s impressions of their time there. Did you manage to go to the Night Safari? That, to me, was one of the highlights of my many visits down there, along with the Chilli crab in the rough-and-ready dai pai dongs scattered throughout the city. Delicious!
I think I should start planning a trip out east soon…

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noel June 9, 2014 at 1:15 pm

It’s been too long since I’ve been to Singapore, want to visit again soon…loved seeing the new places to visit there.

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Suzanne Stavert June 9, 2014 at 1:43 pm

I was so excited to see your post! We are planning a Singapore/Maldives trip late next year. I loved the fact that you connected with a local travel blogger, wonderful idea. My favorite photo of this post was your sparkling nighttime photo from Altitude Bar. Great and helpful post, thank you.

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Carole Terwilliger Meyers June 9, 2014 at 1:45 pm

Singapore is on my bucket list. Thanks for the introduction and itinerary for a two-day visit. I’ve filed it away.

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The GypsyNesters June 9, 2014 at 2:00 pm

We would love to see Singapore! My old boss had spent quite a bit of time there and regaled us with all kinds of stories. One story involved cameras in the urinals (was he just kidding? I’ve never been able to confirm!) Nevertheless, manning the security footage would NOT be my idea of a dream job! -Veronica

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Suzanne Fluhr June 10, 2014 at 3:11 pm

Apparently, men not quite aiming right is a preoccupation in S.E. Asia. There was that “Do not inject water into the ground” sign that Mr. Excitement took in the men’s bathroom at the Thai Royal Palace. http://www.boomeresque.com/say-what-southeast-asia-signs/

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Doreen Pendgracs June 9, 2014 at 2:34 pm

Very interesting post, Suzanne.

I love how you meet up with local bloggers wherever you go. It’s a great way to get local insights when you don’t “know” anyone in a specific destination.

I look forward to reading about your next adventure with Mr. E.

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Suzanne Fluhr June 10, 2014 at 3:08 pm

Stay tuned, Doreen — next up, Munich, Vienna and Budapest in September—followed by South Africa in October—-all thanks to Mr. Excitement’s international science peeps.

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santafetraveler June 9, 2014 at 4:37 pm

Some great Singapore info here. BTW you are the queen of traveling bloggers- you seen to connect everywhere.

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Suzanne Fluhr June 10, 2014 at 3:07 pm

Billie, one of the best thing to come out of travel blogging for me has been the chance to meet other people with a similar travel addiction — first virtually, and then, when possible, in person. Hmm. I recall meeting one particular travel blogger in, where was it?, oh yeah, Santa Fe, New Mexico. 😉

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Marcia @ Menopausal Mother June 9, 2014 at 6:22 pm

Great way to see all the sites. The architecture is incredible!

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Anita @ No Particular Place To Go June 9, 2014 at 7:25 pm

The history of Singapore has always interested me and, after reading this post, I’ve put the city on my list of “must sees” when we travel to Asia. Your tour was terrific and it’s easy to see that we could spend weeks there trying to see all the city has to offer!

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Suzanne Fluhr June 10, 2014 at 3:03 pm

Anita, I don’t know about “weeks”—it’s a small island/city-state, but I think it’s a great place to start or end a trip to SE Asia.

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Michelle June 10, 2014 at 12:37 am

I have thought of using Singapore as my start and end point when traveling to Asia which I love. I have always traveled to Bangkok and flown out of that airport to the other places I’ve visited. I know Singapore will be a great deal more expensive, but I think your post has convinced me that the extra money will be worth feeling safe. It looks like such a beautiful city too from your photos and your “selfie” is fantastic!

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Suzanne Fluhr June 10, 2014 at 3:05 pm

True confession: Jaclynn (the other person in the photo) actually took the selfie. She was very helpful because she taught me where you’re supposed to look! So, here’s the question, is it a “selfie” if someone else (also in the photo) takes it? I might have to pose that question on social media.

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Roz Warren June 10, 2014 at 9:58 am

Havent been to Singapore in DECADES. This brought back memories.

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Suzanne Fluhr June 10, 2014 at 3:01 pm

People, I can say with almost 100% accuracy that Roz has never been to Singapore. She is just trying to be a loyal commenter friend 🙂

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Nancie June 10, 2014 at 4:39 pm

I love Singapore and pretty much made my rounds to everything you mention here. I also spent a day at the zoo, which I loved. The zoo and the botanical gardens were definitely my favorite places.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 11, 2014 at 1:24 am

We missed the zoos. Zoos often make me sad. Given the heat and humidity, I wonder if they have polar bears in the Singapore zoo—-or anything with fur for that matter.

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Lisa Richardson June 11, 2014 at 12:33 am

Enjoyed your overview very much but no street food??? What would Rick Steves say?

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 11, 2014 at 1:25 am

Rick Steves would be silent since he doesn’t cover Singapore—-or the rest of Asia, for that matter. I wish he did. I don’t go to any European country without Rick.

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David Eskin June 11, 2014 at 2:02 pm

I’ve only been to the Singapore airport, flying from somewhere to somewhere. It was the most beautiful and interesting airport I’ve been to. I bought some wonderfully carved chopsticks there. What a mistake to not have stayed and spent a few days in the city, but the experience taught me to never fly through a city I’ve never been to without staying for a while.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 11, 2014 at 8:57 pm

I wish I has spent more time in Changi Airport in Singapore 😉 People rave about it so much, but we just showed up three hours before our flight and that was that. We arrived by cruise ship.

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Connie McLeod June 13, 2014 at 10:45 am

I loved visiting Singapore! I have the fondest memory of drinking a Singapore Sling at the Raffles Hotel and throwing peanut shells on the floor.

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Dyanne@TravelnLass June 14, 2014 at 6:24 pm

Just couldn’t resist an additional comment here, mi amiga…

Uh, that Singapore Sling at Raffles surely must have cost your and Mr. E a pretty penny. When I was there I heard it was 30 bucks (so I passed). True?

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Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) June 15, 2014 at 12:02 am

It was Lady’s night, so only Steve had to pay the $25S cover charge and the lady (I.e. moi) got a “free” Singapore Sling. So, for the 2 of us and one drink, it was $20 USD, which we thought was worth it when all was said and done. Live band. Great view. Last night splurge.

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Franca June 15, 2014 at 1:37 pm

We loved Singapore even if at times it felt a bit too “perfect” and pristine to be real.

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Suzanne Fluhr June 15, 2014 at 1:45 pm

That’s what’s kind of amazing. It is real. I think the place was so devastated by WWII, the populace was/is willing to sacrifice some “freedoms” for civil society. We’ll see how it goes the further in time they get from the mayhem.

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alison @GreenWithRenvy June 15, 2014 at 3:32 pm

I’ve never been to Singapore, but you certainly gave us a great overview. When I went to Mumbai, I tried to get in touch with a local blogger, but it never worked out. You’ve demonstrated it’s a terrific idea to get some local insight. I was able to get in touch with a shop keeper after my arrival and like your meeting, it resulted in some great tips. It’s something I now incorporate into all my travel plans, usually with great results.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 2, 2014 at 7:00 pm

I have really enjoyed meeting other travel bloggers all over the world and when they are passing through my home town of Philadelphia.

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Montecristo Travels (Sonja) June 28, 2014 at 6:13 pm

May just have to look into the dog angle — cause now my curiosity is peaked!

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Elaine Masters July 16, 2014 at 4:14 pm

Loved your quick tips about Singapore. We had only a long layover to get into the city and saw some of the sights you mention. One you didn’t – the very cool Gardens by the Bay – the electric tree towers. We saw them at midnight and ended up with dinner on the Boat Quay near Raffles. I so look forward to spending more time exploring that varied, compact and efficient city/country/island.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 16, 2014 at 11:37 pm

Thanks, Elaine. We definitely didn’t see everything.

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Sand In My Suitcase August 7, 2014 at 11:44 pm

The last time we were in Singapore many years ago, Janice was so afraid of getting arrested for chewing gum :-). Fast forward to next year – we should be in Singapore before and after a Windstar cruise up the Malay Peninsula. And we’re looking forward to it… Maybe we’ll pop over to Raffles for a sling (the only thing is it’s a bit pricey there!).

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 3, 2014 at 3:58 am

I looked at the expensive “sling” at Raffles as the paying for the view—with a Singapore Sling thrown in 🙂

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hesedetang * September 3, 2014 at 4:54 am

Hello!

Being Singaporean, it was good fun reading your thoughts about our island nation 😉 Thank you for including the link on your comment 😛

I personally have travelled around a fair deal, and I’ve lived abroad too. Whilst Singapore is not the best/worst place to live, it certainly isn’t my favourite, but this is my lot in life 😉 Many of my friends have migrated abroad to find greener pastures, and a number of my overseas friends cannot understand why. It’s probably why they say the grass is always greener on the other side.

P.S. Technically it isn’t illegal to chew gum in Singapore, it is illegal to sell or transact it XD And of course, to stick it anywhere other than into the litter bin 😛 I have some legal training behind me too, but I am not a lawyer (fortunately or not) 😉

Cheers,
Debbie from Singapore

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 3, 2014 at 9:25 am

That’s very enlightened of them to go after the gum pushers (distributors) rather than the gum addicts 😉 I enjoyed visiting Singapore, but I can see how it could give one island fever after awhile.

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