Boomeresque:Definition
1. Adj.: Describing a person born between 1 Jan. 1946 and 31 Dec. 1964
2. Adj.: Description of a person, place or thing possessing Baby Boomer je ne sais quoi
3. See also, Boomer, Esq.: A Baby Boomer who is also a licensed attorney (See, e.g., About).

“If You Want to Make God Laugh, Tell Him about Your Plans” — Carpe Diem Edition

by Suzanne Fluhr on May 4, 2014 · 95 comments

Carpe Diem

Carpe DiemIf you’re a Baby Boomer, you’ve been on this planet long enough to probably concur with the statement: “Life is a trip”. I recently celebrated a milestone birthday. As I suspect it has for many, this occasioned a good deal of reflection on my life so far and my hopes and expectations for the future.

The mental review of my six decades on this planet filled me with gratitude. I was blessed with an interesting  a happy childhood, and was born into the first generation (in the United States anyway) where it was almost considered “normal” for a woman to aspire to higher education and a career. I found Steve (a/k/a Mr. Excitement), a life partner who, as trite as it may sound, has been my best friend and my port in the storm for almost 32 years. (Second time is definitely the charm.) We produced two sons who we were able to shepherd through the shoals of adolescence and who appear to have emerged as solid citizens.

My joining Steve as a 60 year old had us both concluding that “the rest is gravy”. Life owes us nothing more. If we were to depart this life now (cover your ears Evil Eye!); hopefully, some people would be sad, but it wouldn’t be a tragedy.

It felt that we had no sooner reached this conclusion when the phone rang with news of a family tragedy. It was Steve’s sister, calling to inform us that Steve’s younger brother (10 years younger!), had died suddenly. The healthy one. The runner. The guy who ate right, who could limit himself to just one spoonful of ice cream.

We snared the last two seats on the red-eye from Honolulu through Phoenix to Chicago. We spent the day dry eyed, in shock, unable to get our heads around the news. The tears came when we joined other family members and listened to his brave wife and teenage daughters describe the hole in their lives left by the loss of their husband and father.

Our sons flew in from Philadelphia and Miami. (If there had been a prize for the family that collectively traveled the farthest to be there, we would have won it). We were grateful we could sit, all four of us, squeezed together on the couch and in the three person back seat of a rental car. When I mentioned how much it helped to grieve with other loved ones, someone told me about a Swedish proverb: “Shared joy is a double joy. Shared sorrow is half a sorrow.”

white hibiscus 250With my little recent health scare and our untimely loss, Carpe diem resonates for us lately. It is doubtful that Mr. and Mrs. Excitement will suddenly turn into wild and crazy people. I don’t see any motorcycles in our future. Steve isn’t planning to retire. However, for us, “Don’t postpone joy” has become so much more than a bumper sticker.

Do you have a carpe diem moment to share? 

{ 87 comments… read them below or add one }

andleeb May 4, 2014 at 6:24 pm

Hello

I feel sorry about the lose of a family member. I feel sorry about his wife and daughters. He must have left a hole in their lives. It must have been a shocking news for you.
No one can say who have to go first, as the angels who will be taking us do not see how healthy we are , how many years we have lived or whom we are leaving behind.

I am happy for your milestone birthday and I can understand it must be a long travel for you but you have a loving husband and wonderful sons and they are your strength and motivation . It is nice to know that you were all together to share the pain and the saying is true that shared sorrow is half sorrow.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:51 am

It was a reminder that we don’t actually get to choose when we arrive and when we leave the dance.

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David Eskin May 5, 2014 at 11:40 am

And I’ve seen Mr. and Mrs. Excitement dancing, and they are entrancing!

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Paul Graham May 4, 2014 at 6:30 pm

Hi Suzanne. My carpe diem revelation wasn’t so much a moment as a process. Given an estimate of six months to live twenty years ago as I am now in very good health but spent the recovery time re-calibrating how to live. In essence I decided to pursue happiness more directly and cut out money as the middleman. Haven’t looked back since. You have certainly had quite the time of it over the last few weeks but anytime you come through a shock with a Woody Allan quote you probably have the right attitude

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:53 am

Oh dear, Paul. A 6 month prognosis will definitely get one’s attention. I actually experienced that also. Fortunately, I only had to deal with that for 3 days before further testing brought much better news.

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Donna Barbisch May 4, 2014 at 7:56 pm

Hey Suzanne, thanks for sharing. Life really is short and of course, it gets shorter every day. I enjoy hearing how you are “making hay while the sun shines” but am sorry too, for your loss. We, those of us who made it through the 60s and somehow chose a path that allows us the freedom to explore at this time in life, are really the lucky ones. But, as you say, life is fragile. Any one of us could draw the short straw and be gone tomorrow. Your brother-in-law, my sister…we mourn their loss. But we do need to learn from their short lives. What would they wish for us? I think my sister would want me to achieve what we were put here on this earth to do. Perhaps it is to learn to enjoy life, or maybe to solve some of the challenges this world faces, I don’t really know (but I am working on it). I applaud your intestinal fortitude (oh wait, is that what got you down? lol). As I like to say, you are taking command of your future…the cruise before Honolulu, and the sabbatical in Hawaii! So, Mr and Mrs excitement, what’s next? I agree carpe diem! Hope to see you in Phili.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:56 am

Thanks for reading, Donna. I haven’t exactly figured out exactly what I was supposed to do during my stint on this earth, but I’m trying to enjoy the journey and to really believe that worrying doesn’t solve anything.

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Tim May 4, 2014 at 9:38 pm

That is a beautiful post and my condolences to you and your family. I can absolutely relate to your words as they are the words of my mother as she wanted nothing more than for her children to be happy and live life to the fullest. It is my duty to make sure I succeed in that without postponing it.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:56 am

It’s kind of a balancing act—-being responsible while not overly postponing joy.

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Robin May 4, 2014 at 10:05 pm

We think that travel to an exotic place will protect us from the sorrows of life. Loving helps buffer what sorrows may come. But life brings unexpected turns no matter where we are or what we’re doing. I’ve enjoyed reading about your experiences. They’ve inspired me to live more fully and keep on planning.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:57 am

Keep on planning, Robin. God doesn’t always laugh. Sometimes, s/he cooperates.

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Laurie Hurley May 4, 2014 at 10:21 pm

So very sorry for your loss, Suzanne. But, it seems there was a silver lining – your boys got to join you. I am three years from 60 and my girls are 16 and 19. The nineteen year old is in college, thus not living at home full-time anymore. My carpe diem was the day I tearfully said goodbye to her in a shaded corner at UCLA. Her leaving represented the next phase of my life – without her little body in her bed at home every night. My husband and I have spent more time together of late and are getting to know each other again on a different level. My 16 year old will soon be leaving, too – she has some deep mental health issues and will probably be in a treatment center. Another carpe diem moment, for sure. Enjoy the present, reflect on the past and forge ahead. Again, my deep condolences.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:59 am

Thank you, Laurie. It sounds like you have had a lot on your plate. I hope you have time to smell the roses—-as it were.

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Patti May 5, 2014 at 1:33 am

My condolences for your family’s loss, the universe has such a way of reminding us to pay attention. “Don’t postpone the joy” are wise words to live by.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 4:59 am

You are exactly right. The events of the last few weeks have totally gotten my attention.

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Jacqueline Gum (Jacquie) May 5, 2014 at 5:59 am

I am so very sorry for your loss Suzanne and my condolences to your entire family. My moment came very early in life. We lost my father 2 weeks after his 44 birthday…I had just turned 17. I was struck then by all the things he and my other had planned to do after all the kids were “gone”. How I wish they hadn’t postponed the joy. It taught me something very early on.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:21 pm

Jacquie, I’m sorry you had to learn the carpe diem lesson so young. My niece is 17 and her sister is 15. It was really painful, but also inspiring, to watch them deal with this tragedy in their young lives.

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Dale May 5, 2014 at 6:55 am

I’m really glad that you were all able to come together for each other during what must have been an incredibly trying time, and having see and experienced the same with Franca’s family last year, I completely understand how you both must be feeling, but also appreciate exactly what you’re thinking is from here – live life.

Life is a brittle timespan of moments both good and bad, and if we’re not making the most of each and every one of them and we must try harder.

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Lenie May 5, 2014 at 7:19 am

Hi Suzanne, I’m sorry for your loss but I love the saying “shared sorrow is half the sorrow”. Its so very true. I like your outlook on life – almost quiet contentment.
Lenie

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Tuhin May 5, 2014 at 8:20 am

Sorry for the loss dear..But life moves on… Te good part is that you have this wonderful family of yours’ by your side in this moment of crisis! Take care, may god bless your family with health and smiles in the years to come!

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Dari May 5, 2014 at 9:51 am

Had a little cry after reading this…don’t know why…..
A lot is said here: appreciating family, being happy in life with partner, addressing sudden death, reflecting on raising children, reaching a senior-citizen age, having a serious illness, leaving Hawaii “paradise”……making the most of the rest of one’s life…

Just yesterday an old friend sent me a photo of our high school graduation day…maybe that’s what made me cry….!
Have a safe trip home.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:07 pm

Thanks, Dari. Even from the brief amount of time we spent with you, it seemed that you have achieved a good life balance. To be sure, there are more opportunities for a few tears as we age.

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Dyanne@TravelnLass May 5, 2014 at 10:18 am

Beautifully written (as always), my dear. And I’m truly sorry for your family’s loss.

My only “carpe diem” thought to share is but a variation to your “Don’t postpone joy” bumper sticker – my own life-long manta: “This ain’t a dress rehearsal, folks!”

That and… “If we were to depart this life now…it wouldn’t be a tragedy.”

Indeed, now nearing 7 decades on the Planet (and having recently backpacked my merry solo way across Nepal, Borneo and Myanmar), I dare say, definitely no regrets whatsoever, and each extra morning (like this one, here in Ecuador) I’m given, is but frosting on a most wonderful life-cake!

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:09 pm

Dyanne, having made your acquaintance in Chiang Mai, Thailand and following along as you catch up with Nepal and share your new experiences in Ecuador, I would say, you are the carpe diem poster child!

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santafetravelers May 5, 2014 at 10:22 am

What a birthday week! Carpe diem is a great motto to live by no matter what your age. Apparently God has a very wry sense of humor and likes to laugh a lot.

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Anita @ No Particular Place To Go May 5, 2014 at 10:57 am

You’ve not only written a lovely tribute to all of your family but also focused on an important take-away message “Seize the day”! We had our own (slow) personal awakening about 3 years ago with the realization that if we wanted to pursue our dream of travel NOW was the only time we had. If we wait for “the right moment” to set off on life’s adventures the time may never come…

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Suzanne Fluhr May 6, 2014 at 4:53 am

Embarking on extended travel is a little like deciding to have children. There’s no perfect time. You just have to do it.

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William Rusho May 5, 2014 at 11:14 am

I too am sympathetic for your loss. One thing we must always remember is nothing will be around forever, that is the constant reality of the universe.

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Maddy Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 12:47 pm

Hi, Suzanne – needless to say we were shocked and heartbroken for all of you when we heard the news about Bruce. I need to have Eddie immediately read this post as he is balking at taking a week off from work this summer so we can do a family road trip to Portland, OR to visit some old friends and see some sites – ie. create memories with the fam!! Emma would love to travel everywhere – I think it’s in her DNA from Poppa Bob! Anyway, Eddie needs a Carpe Diem primer. (Granted, he was off not too long ago for 10 weeks recovering from a hernia operation – I know he is balancing responsibility, nonetheless…..)

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:11 pm

Even if Eddie doesn’t think he can swing it, you and Emma should definitely go. Hopefully, he’ll come to his senses, but don’t make me the heavy! Looking forward to seeing you soon.

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Irene S. Levine May 5, 2014 at 1:35 pm

I am so sorry for your loss, Susan. What a heartfelt and beautiful post~
It’s a poignant reminder to be so thankful for every precious minute of life.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:13 pm

Thank you, Irene. I am really hoping to be able to get to being a garden variety travel blogger soon.

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Susan Cooper May 5, 2014 at 2:49 pm

I cried. I am so sorry for your and your husband’s loss but I do understand the power of grieving with loved ones. I do wish you all the best as you travel though this life. It is indeed a trip. 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:14 pm

Thank you, Susan. Sometimes the trip gets a little too trippy, but we carry on.

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Cathy Sweeney May 5, 2014 at 4:37 pm

Suzanne – First, I’m so sorry for the loss of your brother-in-law. The Swedish proverb is very interesting — and so true. I suppose I’ve had more than one carpe diem moment. But the one that usually comes to the top of my mind is my husband’s massive heart attach in 2005. Doctors said it was “the widow maker”. But he survived. As time passes, we sometimes forget to seize the day even after those experiences. Thanks for the reminder.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:16 pm

Doctors do have a way with words. Ironically, my brother-in-law might have survived a heart attack had he been older because if he had silent heart disease, he would have had time to build up collateral coronary circulation.

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Sharon Greenthal May 5, 2014 at 5:12 pm

It never leaves the back of my mind that all of this could be gone in an instant. Some days it’s harder to appreciate that fact than others, but I do touch on it every single day. Thank you for this reminder.

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Nancie May 5, 2014 at 5:38 pm

Hi Suzanne,

Death of a family member is always difficult, and I think more so when it’s the brother/sister that makes that extra effort to really look out for their health. May your brother-in-law rest in peace.

Yesterday I learned of another on line friend that has died (the 3rd one in about 6 months). That made for a reflective day yesterday. I think when your time comes it comes. However, unless I am terminally ill, I don’t think I will ever say I have lived long enough. 🙂 I think that attitude comes from my 90 year old Dad, who it still going strong!

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:19 pm

My father lived to be 85 and my mother just had a “you’re in excellent health” check up at 89, but I still don’t want to be greedy. I’m trying to enjoy life one day at a time. Having said that, we just bought non-refundable plane tickets for a trip to Europe in September, so I guess I am looking ahead some.

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Michelle May 5, 2014 at 5:52 pm

I’m glad you’re back and enjoyed your post which as usual is serious, interesting and funny at the same time. I’ve had far too many carpe diem moments in the past few years with so many friends and family receiving a cancer diagnosis. I always try to remember that every day is a gift. I love your quote “Shared joy is a double joy. Shared sorrow is half a sorrow.”. I plan to share that soon. I hope you and your husband enjoy the rest of your time in Hawaii 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 6:20 pm

Thanks, Michelle. From what I have seen on your blog, you are not letting any moss grow under your feet!

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William Butler May 5, 2014 at 7:10 pm

Hi Suzanne,
My Carpe Diem moment was March 24, 1981. I outlined the circumstances in my post previous to this one about my near death experiences, of being dead and brought back to life. When you face death more than once, and have a number of other close calls, you get more than one Aha moment, or ‘Carpe Diem’ as you call it.

In one car accident I was in, the car flipped end over end 8 times, crossing the median and landing upside down on the opposite side of the highway.

I am not afraid to die, but I am also very grateful for every day. That’s my takeaway.

Kind Regards,
Bill

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Leslie in Portland, Oregon May 5, 2014 at 7:55 pm

I am very sorry for your family’s loss, Suzanne. May your brother-in-law rest in peace.

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Agness May 5, 2014 at 8:38 pm

Happy birthday sweetheart. You’ve been my travel inspiration for a while and I absolutely agree – LIFE IS A JOURNEY!

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Jay May 5, 2014 at 8:57 pm

Don’t postpone joy are words to live by. People tend to spend so much time focusing on the negative than living in the happiness of now.

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Linda ~ Journey Jottings May 5, 2014 at 10:43 pm

A sad and poignant post Suzanne.
Due maybe to these social media channels where you get to ‘know’ people and hear about insights into their lives and their friends/family’s lives, I feel more people are realizing the importance of seizing the day and are throwing a little more caution to the wind than they might otherwise have done so as to make the most of our time here -which is sometimes more limited than we care to imagine.

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Neva @ Retire for the Fun of it May 6, 2014 at 12:08 am

My thoughts and prayers have been with you during these past weeks.

We just returned from Wisconsin after celebrating the life of a wonderful aunt. What’s amazing about her life is no matter how difficult her life’s struggles became, she dealt with them all with a great sense of humor and strength. She has been and will be a source of reflection on why it is important to seize each day with determination.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 6, 2014 at 4:58 am

Thank you, Neva. My husband’s grandmother lived to be almost 98 with a host of difficult situations in her life—having to flee Europe at the beginning of World War II and surviving both her children. The death of a grandchild would have been a heavy blow. But, she was such a resilient person — a truly “the glass is half full” type of person. I strive to be more like she was.

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Catarina May 6, 2014 at 5:15 am

Carpe diem is a part of life, provided we are able to enjoy the moment without contemplating what the long term outcome will be. Happens all the time. Sometimes it’s just a matter of laughing in the middle of sorrow. And it makes such a difference to be able to do so.

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Jo May 6, 2014 at 5:45 am

You are so right Suzanne. I know so many people who do nothing they really “want” to do, waiting patiently to retire. So often they retire only to become too sick to do what they’ve waited all their lives to do. Seize the day, and let that be a loving legacy to your brother in law

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Patti Morrow May 6, 2014 at 8:40 am

Very sorry for your loss. Every day is a special gift. I tried to teach my children several things as they were growing up — treat others with kindness, always give everything you do your best, you are responsible for your own happiness, and never let anyone steal your joy. And of course, the ubiquitous, s#@* happens. So far, so good.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 7, 2014 at 5:40 am

Yep. You can pretty much count on the “sh*t happens” thing if you live long enough.

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Carole Terwilliger Meyers May 6, 2014 at 12:25 pm

Death is always a surprise. Which, as I think about it, is probably a good thing.

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Suzanne Fluhr May 7, 2014 at 5:41 am

Carole, sometimes it’s more of a surprise than at other times. Trust me on this.

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noel May 6, 2014 at 3:10 pm

I don’t understand how that happens to the person who is always doing the right thing – in any case it is a testament to the family to gather and share in this process. I’m glad you are able to still go back to Hawaii to finish your visit…do come to the Big Island though!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 6, 2014 at 6:07 pm

Thanks, Noel. We are going to miss a trip to the Big Island this trip, unfortunately. We’re hoping we’ll be back next winter. Meanwhile, you are welcome to stop off in Philly on your way to Europe some time.

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alison @GreenWithRenvy May 6, 2014 at 3:42 pm

Suzanne, What a beautifully written piece. I too had tears in my eyes, as all to often we are waking up to news of tragedy and loss. Having a close knit family can be such a comfort and I am happy you all had support. I like the term ‘don’t postpone the joy’. It’s a nice thought to have each and every day.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 6, 2014 at 6:04 pm

Thank you. I’m glad my essay resonated for you.

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Suzanne Stavert May 6, 2014 at 10:00 pm

Suzanne, I am so sorry for your loss. A sudden tragedy is a confusing time, but most often the family pulls together and makes it through. It is amazing how resilient we can be when we need to be. How lovely for your sons to drop everything to be with the family. Your brother in law was a young man, I am so very sorry.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 7, 2014 at 1:59 am

Thank you, Suzanne. It was nice that both our sons wanted to come and made the effort to do so. We raised them in a close extended family and I think they wanted to be with everyone.

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Jackie Humphries Smith May 7, 2014 at 10:35 am

I turned 60 last July and declared the six months prior and the following six would be months of ‘celebration and carpe diem’ – we’ve watched too many family and friends take that final journey in recent years. I am so sorry about your loss but I certainly understand how such things reinforce that ‘carpe diem!’ mantra!!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 9, 2014 at 4:21 am

Thanks for your comment, Jackie. I also decided to celebrate this milestone birthday all year. Why not?

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Jeri May 7, 2014 at 7:08 pm

I’m about to carpe some diem by heading to Sante Fe tomorrow for my 15th wedding anniversary weekend. I met my hubby when I was 19, and we got married in Vegas at 22. Traveling is the one thing we will never give up.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 9, 2014 at 4:24 am

Congratulations, Jeri. One thing I’ve learned about marriage is that when it’s good, it’s good and one way to nurture it is to share travel experiences. We visited Santa Fe and New Mexico in 2013. We enjoyed it. http://www.boomeresque.com/a-boomeresque-visit-to-santa-fe-new-mexico-2/

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Jason B May 8, 2014 at 8:50 am

I’ve had a few carpe diem moments. I don’t want to be that person that has the what if questions when I’m on my death bed. I try to live in the moment everyday.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 9, 2014 at 4:26 am

We just heard about another one of those horrible “moments” today — a Penn grad student killed by a car while walking on the sidewalk on the same route my husband walks to work everyday when we’re in Philly. Take time to smell the roses.

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Christina May 8, 2014 at 6:00 pm

I was happy to hear of your milestone birthday then saddened by the loss of a family member. The proverb really stuck in my mind. We need people in our lives to rejoice in the successes and lighten the load during the hard times.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 9, 2014 at 4:27 am

It seems to be the case, that “loving” helps with the hard times. And there will be hard times.

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Ryan May 9, 2014 at 1:11 am

Hi Suzanne, I’m terribly sorry to read about your loss and for the family. I too have been through a similar stage in my life where sudden loss spurned me into action for life and pursuit of my own joy. My mother had passed when I was in the beginning of high school, but I still had some support system through my father. But when I was 19 my father died of a heart attack leaving my brother and I with nobody left. For a while I did the safe “future planning and career” method, but it was eating away at my soul. Eventually I crashed through rock bottom and tumbled into my own self created purgatory, unhappy with my life, angry, and blaming everyone for all of my problems. It was only then that I understood if I kept on that, I’d disappear from this earth as well so I pulled myself back up and started pursuing my passions. I write this from Thailand where 4 years prior I would have never thought it was in my cards that were dealt. Except now I hold the cards. Carpe Diem!

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Annah Elizabeth May 20, 2014 at 12:48 pm

So happy to see you found your way up off the floor and to something that brings you joy, Ryan! Kudos, Journeyer!!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 9, 2014 at 4:28 am

Thanks for sharing your story Ryan. You’ve obviously had more of your share of tragedy. It seems unfair that it is spread around seemingly unevenly. I’m glad you found yourself and your raison d’etre before falling through the bottom.

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Ilaria May 9, 2014 at 9:44 am

Hi Suzanne, I’m very sorry for your big loss… hope you and your family can go ahead and feel better soon. We shouldn’t think “I will do it tomorrow” or “sooner or later”, we can’t leave untold words because we could regret about it.. So, as you told, ‘don’t postpone joy’ and do things now.

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maxwell ivey May 9, 2014 at 2:11 pm

Hi Suzanne; Thanks for sharing, I plan to quote that proverb. smile I have an uncle who is a marathon runner ex marine always healthy and he has ben going through a health scare of his own. I can del the stress in my aunt. glad you could all join together to support each other at such a sad time. and i love your thought that life owes us nothing. I know you are thinking of it in terms of being 60 but its really true for all of us no matter our age. thanks again and take care, max

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 11, 2014 at 7:26 am

Thanks, Max. I know that life “owes us nothing” at any age, but it is a tragedy when one doesn’t get to approach a full life span. Dying when one still has children at home, just seems to be more wrong than when someone with more living under their belt gets called home.

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Meredith Wouters May 9, 2014 at 8:29 pm

Suzanne, I’m so sorry for your family’s loss. What a shock. I know there are no guarantees in life, but somehow it still seems so wrong. But you’re right, today is the day, and we make of it what we will. I really like that thought: don’t postpone joy. Praying for peace and comfort for your family…

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Debra Yearwood May 10, 2014 at 3:21 am

I’m so sorry for your loss, what a sad and shocking experience. You are so right in noting your blessings. It so easy to be caught up in the negative and for no reason at all when life for many of us has been wonderful.

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A.K.ANdrew May 10, 2014 at 1:23 pm

Thanks so much for sharing this Suzanne , and very sorrow to hear of your loss. Sudden death is the worst kind, but certainly when someone close to us dies, it does make us realize that we can’t waste days on negativity as there are so few of them left, at whatever age you are. So, though it’s hard to achieve at times, it’s good to try and live this day as if it were your last.

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Catherine May 12, 2014 at 3:53 pm

So sorry to hear about your loss. It’s never easy, but glad you’re taking a positive outlook and great to hear that you’re surrounded by loved ones. Take care.

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Susan Chase-Foster May 16, 2014 at 6:22 pm

Hi Suzanne,

You’ve managed to turn sorrowful time into a learning moment for yourself and others and I appreciate it. My carpe diem moment occurred when my mom passed away. She smiled, exhaled and moved on. I knew then that she was leaving me with a beautiful lesson about the transience of life and to love each moment, even one’s death, but never to fret over change because ultimately it’s all good. My little grandson, whom Mom never met, is ironically teaching me the same lesson through his awe, his pure love of life. <3

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Debbie May 16, 2014 at 7:24 pm

What a horrible shock that must have been! I’m sorry for your loss, but thank goodness you were able to gather the family together and support each other. That proverb is so right. It’s these types of tragedies that cause us to re-examine our own lives and strive to enjoy each day more. Carpe Diem all the way!

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Annah Elizabeth May 20, 2014 at 1:05 pm

Suzanne,
I’m sorry to hear of your family’s recent tragedy in the death of your brother-in-law. There is never a good time, really, to say goodbye to a loved one, and yet, the unexpected and untimely deaths seem to throw our lives into a tailspin… Sending healing energy to all of you…

How do I Carpe diem? I don’t really seize the day, but I do try to make it a point to pay homage to the daily moments that bring me joy or make me feel good. Too often these simple #Happy moments are trounced upon by any negative energy… Four years ago I began a column I call Happy Happens…the closest I come to carpe diem.

May I share one of my recent Happy Happens posts? http://thefivefacets.blogspot.com/2014/05/what-kind-of-mother.html

Happy to make your acquaintance! Look forward to connecting throughout this vast SM land! 🙂

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Lana May 22, 2014 at 1:50 am

So sorry for your loss. Thank you for the reminder to live each day well!

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Betsy Wuebker June 27, 2014 at 4:00 pm

What a beautiful way to honor your loved one’s memory with this post and your plans to live life to the fullest. It’s true that we always think we have more time. Having recently turned 60 myself, I am frequently reminded this isn’t the case. I’m looking forward to following your adventures. Aloha.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 3, 2014 at 10:27 pm

Thanks, Betsy. I must say, 60 has continued to remind me to seize the day.

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Marcia @ Blogitudes August 18, 2014 at 1:22 am

“The rest if gravy” – I love that! It’s such an excellent attitude to have. I’m only 5 years away from your current birthday mark – and so hope that within the next 5 years I’ll be all about that “gravy” attitude as well. Time to lay down the worries of what might happen today, tomorrow, or the next day and seize the current day so it can be lived to its fullest! Excellent way to live … and an excellent post! Thank you!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr August 18, 2014 at 3:06 am

It was kind of amazing how that milestone 60th birthday caused me to pause and take stock of my life thus far and conclude that “the rest is gravy”. Sometimes I forget, but I’m able to reorient myself usually.

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Maggibee June 16, 2016 at 6:08 am

Beautifully put, Suzanne, and I sympathise with your loss.

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