Boomeresque:Definition
1. Adj.: Describing a person born between 1 Jan. 1946 and 31 Dec. 1964
2. Adj.: Description of a person, place or thing possessing Baby Boomer je ne sais quoi
3. See also, Boomer, Esq.: A Baby Boomer who is also a licensed attorney (See, e.g., About).

A Boomeresque Visit to Santa Fe, New Mexico

by Suzanne Fluhr on October 9, 2013 · 49 comments

New Mexico Licence Plate - Land of Enchantment

In a break from our usual pattern, our trip to northern New Mexico, including Santa Fe, was not tacked onto work travel for Mr. Excitement to commune with his medical research peeps. In other words, we chose to go to New Mexico because even though we’re both well traveled Baby Boomers (i.e. we are THAT old), neither of us had ever set foot in the Land of Enchantment.

New Mexico Licence Plate - Land of Enchantment

We live in Philadelphia which has a hub airport, but it turns out you cannot fly directly to Albuquerque, New Mexico from there. It only took me about a nano-second to choose to fly to Albuquerque via Dallas, Texas rather than through Chicago’s O’Hare International airport. Given Mr. Excitement’s last two experiences trying to fly out of O’Hare, I was afraid he would opt for a staycation if I told him we would have to change planes there.

On the appointed Saturday, we left our Philadelphia apartment at 7:00 a.m. and pulled into the parking area of our Santa Fe bed and breakfast  inn exactly 12 and a half hours later. We were both thrilled that the thunder storms that arrived in Dallas exactly when we were supposed to be taking off from there, only left us trapped on the tarmac in our metal tube, cheek to germ with our fellow passengers, for an extra hour. I can’t swear that’s where Mr. and Mrs. Excitement both caught the head colds that plagued (but did not ruin) the rest of our trip, but it’s a good candidate.

I had pre-arranged for a car rental at Albuquerque’s Sunport International Airport and we were soon on our way to Santa Fe in an under-powered Ford Focus. Santa Fe is only about 65 miles from Albuquerque. There are legal speed limits of 75 miles per hour for most of the way. (I can’t swear that we northeast I-95 corridor drivers never reach 75 mph, but in New Mexico, they do it legally.)

I know that at some point during my education, I had to memorize the capitals of all the states, but I had quite forgotten that Santa Fe, a city with a population of only approximately 70,000, is the capital of New Mexico. Indeed, it has been the capital of New Mexico for 403 years, since 1610 when it was under Spanish control, then as part of Mexico, and then as a United States territory between 1850 and 1912 when it became the 47th state. (We’re not counting the 12 years between 1680 and 1692 when there was a Pueblo Indian revolt that drove the Spaniards out of town nor a brief interlude under Confederate governance.)

Inn of the Turquoise Bear, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Inn of the Turquoise Bear, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Dining Room, Inn of the Turquoise Bear, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Dining Room, Inn of the Turquoise Bear, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Our entry into Santa Fe via a commercial strip road lined with the usual big box suspects did not seem auspicious, but we felt better when we turned into the courtyard of the historic  Inn of the Turquoise Bear. This turned out to be a good choice for us, but it might be off-putting for travelers who prefer not to interact with other guests. Wine is served in the homey, common living room at 6:00 p.m. each evening and the excellent made to order breakfast is served at one long table in the dining room. Fortunately, one of us is quite happy to chat with interesting strangers. (I’ll let you guess who that is). The “must sees” in Santa Fe are are within walking distance — especially if you like to walk.

By the time we were settled in, it was time for dinner. Our innkeeper recommended Cafe Pasqual’s in the Plaza area. Apparently, so do all the other innkeepers. Pasqual’s was hopping and full. We were hungry and we really didn’t have a Plan B, so we opted for the restaurant across the street, Tabla de Los Santos in the Hotel St. Francis. Given our travel exhaustion, we were attracted by the comfortably appointed dining room that was not overflowing nor noisy.

Tabla de los Santos Restaurant in the St. Francis Hotel, Old Santa Fe, New Mexico

Tabla de los Santos Restaurant in the St. Francis Hotel, Old Santa Fe, New Mexico

This turned out to be the second most expensive meal of our trip. Service was well paced and knowledgeable, but neither of us were wowed by the food. (I suppose I should admit that Mr. and Mrs. Excitement split a salad and we both ordered the same chicken entree. I don’t think real restaurant reviewers do this). On the other hand, I thought the sangria was some of the best I’ve had—although red wine sangria might not have been the best choice for our first night at 7,000 feet. (In fairness, based on TripAdvisor reviews, our opinion of the food might be an outlier).

We were told, and everything we read, said that museums in Santa Fe are closed on Mondays after Labor Day, so we put off our planned walking tour of old Santa Fe and headed up Museum Hill on the Old Santa Fe Trail. (Don’t be picturing us hiking on this “trail”. The covered wagons of the 19th century have given way to a paved road and motor vehicles). Others seemed surprised that we weren’t done in by a mile walk up hill at altitude, but we found the walk “breathtaking” only in the gorgeous scenery sense of the word. The high desert air was crisp, the sky was a cloudless cobalt blue and there were blooming wildflowers courtesy of an unusual wet spell shortly before our arrival.

Wild Flowers on Museum Hill, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Wild Flowers on our way up Museum Hill, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Museum Hill could rightly be called “Museums” Hill because it is home to 5 museums and a new botanical garden. We enjoyed our visits to three of them: the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and the Museum of International Folk Art. (We skipped the Santa Fe Children’s Museum (because our children are 20-somethings off doing their own thing in other parts of the world) and the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian (because we ran out of time). My favorite exhibits were the sculpture garden of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and, somewhat to my surprise, the Alexander Girard collection in the Museum of International Folk Art — a large room full of crafts from around the world, especially myriad miniature towns and tableaus. When we were suffering from “museum feet” and were starving, the Museum Hill Cafe provided a nice interlude — al fresco dining with a view.

Sculpture Garden, Museum of Indian Art and Culture, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Sculpture Garden, Museum of Indian Art and Culture, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Mexican Day of the Dead figures from the Museum of International Folk Art, Alexander Girard collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Mexican Day of the Dead figures from the Museum of International Folk Art, Alexander Girard collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico

We did pay $5.00 each to visit the botanical garden which is designed to showcase the natural plants of the area, but it is very new so some imagining was required. When it has matured, I think it will be well worth a visit.

One thing Steve (Mr. Excitement) has learned about travel bloggers is that we enjoy meeting up with other travel bloggers whenever possible. Fortunately, since by definition — travel bloggers travel — opportunities do arise to meet virtual friends in person. Our visit to Santa Fe presented me with the welcome chance to meet Billie Frank and Steve Collins, the Santa Fe Travelers. I presented Billie with the difficult task of finding a place for dinner that did not serve spicy food. Some would argue that visiting New Mexico and insisting that they “hold the chile” verges on blasphemy, but Billie and Steve humored my pathetic palate and took us to an Italian restaurant. I can’t really comment on the food because we conversed so intently that the food was kind of irrelevant. If you are planning your trip to Santa Fe, Billie, Steve and their blog are a great resource.

St. Francis of Assisi outside St. Francis Cathedral Basilica, Old Santa Fe, New Mexico

St. Francis of Assisi outside St. Francis Cathedral Basilica, Old Santa Fe, New Mexico

Of the four cities we visited during our week in New Mexico (Santa Fe, Taos, Los Alamos and Albuquerque), Santa Fe seems to have done the best job of preserving the old adobe pueblo style of architecture. Just from the look of the town, we felt that we were someplace “different”, but Santa Fe’s appellation as “The City Different” was earned by its attractiveness to “eccentric” artistic types long before diversity was celebrated elsewhere. Santa Fe was the first city in the United States named a “UNESCO Creative City”.

Courtyard of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe

Courtyard of the New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe

On Monday, we went on a walking tour with Historic Walks of Santa Fe. This, or some of the other walking tours on offer, is a good first activity to help you orient yourself (both in time and space) in the Plaza area of old Santa Fe. When we passed the New Mexico Museum of Art — it was open, notwithstanding the sign on the door that said it was closed (huh?). The guy at the desk assured us that this was not an example of “The City Different” purposely messing with tourists’ minds. He somewhat sheepishly admitted that they simply hadn’t gotten their act together to officially get the word out that they decided to stay open on Mondays for a few extra weeks. That’s okay. This oversight paled in comparison to the concurrent failure of the Congress of the United States to fund the federal government, thus depriving us of the opportunity to visit the Native American pueblos and cliff dwellings at the Bandelier National Monument.

Thanks to the “Well, yes, actually we are still open on Mondays” thing, we also were able to visit the New Mexico Museum of Art and the New Mexico History Museum which includes the 1610 Palace of the Governors, the oldest public building in the United States. This museum provides an excellent overview of the history of, and the interplay among, the Native Americans, the Spanish and the American Anglos whose destinies converged in New Mexico. (You can purchase a $20 pass that provides admission to all the museums we visited).

On our walks to and from the Plaza area of Santa Fe, we passed the New Mexico State Capitol building that houses the legislature and the Governor’s office. We were glad we stopped in as the building is host to many donated works by New Mexican artists both inside and outside. We were warmly welcomed at the front desk and were told we were free to wander around what seemed to be a mostly deserted building. The unpaid legislature only meets for 60 days one year and 30 days the next.

A sculpture garden outside a Canyon Road art gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

A sculpture garden outside a Canyon Road art gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

 

On our last night in Santa Fe, Mr. and Mrs. Excitement had dinner at Pho Kim, a Vietnamese restaurant in a shopping center. By that point, I was craving soup for my cold and perhaps for some low level dehydration caused by the very dry desert air. The chicken tortilla soup available in most restaurants is laced with chile, so pho it was. You could still add some jalapeños, but they were optional.

Having been wowed by the crystal clear skies we enjoyed during our Santa Fe stay, after our pho repast, I convinced Steve that we would probably be able to see the night sky very well if we got away from the city lights. The farthest Mr. Excitement was willing to drive in the inky darkness (it was a new moon — i.e. no moon) was up Museum Hill. We leaned against the car and watched as more and more stars emerged. The clouds arcing across the sky had to be the Milky Way — because there were no clouds.

Before checking out of the Inn of the Turquoise Bear, we walked over to Canyon Road, Santa Fe’s famed art gallery row. This probably deserved more than the morning we had to devote to it. While there are also many art galleries in the Plaza area, the Canyon Road galleries seemed to be for more serious art aficionados and collectors — with concomitantly higher prices.

From Canyon Road, it was on to the high road to Taos — one of those “the trip is the there, there” experiences.

Have you visited Santa Fe? What were your impressions? Do you think it has earned its moniker as “The City Different”? If you have never been, would you consider adding it to your Bucket List?

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{ 47 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar Jo (The Blond) October 10, 2013 at 8:56 am

I wanted to leave a comment under ‘about us’ section, but didn’t see the option.
Anyway, someone said once that they cry virtual happy tear whenever they find another blogger, who decided to quit their jobs and follow their dreams. I must say, that I do the same. I’m so happy for your that you have decided to do and you are doing what you really love.
I don’t despise people, who work hard all their lives and give up on their dreams to pursue a career, but let’s face it – life is so short, why wasting it in an office?
Good luck with all your travels and I will definitely be coming back to your blog.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 10, 2013 at 11:18 pm

Thanks for stopping by, Jo. You can comment on the “About Us” section of the blog via this link: http://www.boomeresque.com/you-know-youre-boomeresque-if/ However, the About Me section doesn’t have functionality for comments. Perhaps I should ask my web guru to add that for me.

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avatar Roz Warren October 10, 2013 at 9:49 am

Glad to get the final version of this post. (This IS the final version, right??) Nice to read about (and enjoy photos of) such a sunny place on a gloomy day like today.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) October 10, 2013 at 5:18 pm

Roz. This is the final version — photos and all. I’d like to blame last week’s snafu on Wordpress gremlins, but it was probably my own gremlins that were the problem.

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avatar santafetraveler October 10, 2013 at 1:24 pm

Steve and I enjoyed meeting you and your Steve. It was great to get to talk over dinner. Great Santa Fe post- love the photos especially the Native American sculpure and the Girard Wing muertos. That’s one of my favorite spots in town. I always leave with a smile on my face. Come back and see us again! You just scratched the surface.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 10, 2013 at 5:28 pm

Billie, thanks to both of you for taking the time to meet up with us. Now it’s your turn to visit Philly, but I guess you should wait until the National Parks reopen since it would be a shame to visit Philly and have to miss Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell.

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avatar santafetraveler October 10, 2013 at 6:41 pm

I’ve been to both- I’d love to do food in Philly- the art museum and get out into the PA countryside.

There’s still plenty to see here with all the shut-downs. Puye Cliffs are open and I like them better than the ones at Bandelier and the Santa Clara Pueblo guides are great. The Cumbres and Toltec train which closes in the winter as the pass gets a lot of snow is great too, but a bit far for a day-trip. There really is a lot here, but I miss the National Parks and Monuments. They need to fund the gov!

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avatar Neva October 10, 2013 at 4:32 pm

Thanks to your post, we will plan to visit this part of New Mexico too. Our favorite area was on the Cumbres Toltec Historic Steam Train ride. This was definitely an area of New Mexico’s Land of Enchantment.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 10, 2013 at 5:32 pm

Northern New Mexico was beautiful. I will be doing a post about our drives. But, you might as well wait until the federal government is funded so you can visit the Bandelier National Monument. As you can imagine, the shut down is horrible for places that depend on visitors to nearby national parks for customers.

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avatar Mike October 10, 2013 at 8:32 pm

It’s wonderful to hear from you on Boomeresque with a post, Suzanne! I’ve been going through withdrawals the past five weeks. That’s wonderful that you and Steve had great weather for the trip and wow you can really see the blue sky in your pictures. That’s shame on Bandelier National Monument but I’m glad you were able to enjoy the other sites. Of course, being a food nut (aka foodie) I looked up the menus for Museum Hill Cafe, Pasqual’s and Tabla de Los Santos as I do in any post I read where the writer visited and ate at the restaurant. I like to pretend I’m there and I chose which items I would order. It’s virtual fun! As I expected the Southwestern architeture was what I expected in your pictures though the inside of the Inn of the Turquoise Bear also seemed rustic inside. And yes, folks who live at sea level need to be warned about drinking alcohol at a higher altitude. A problem I always encountered as a medic with gamblers coming up to Reno (4,500 feet) from San Francisco. I wonder how Dino would have done on your hikes?? 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 10, 2013 at 9:39 pm

Mike, thanks for your extensive comment. Had it really been that long since my last post? Ouch. From the recipes on your site, I think you would have found more to eat in New Mexico than I did. They put chile in everything! Sometimes they don’t even realize things have chile in them. I ordered a salad at the Museum Cafe after being assured it did not have any chile. It had jalapenos in it. I just picked them out the best I could.

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avatar Nelly October 11, 2013 at 12:20 pm

Hello Suzanne!!!

What a wonderful coincidence. I visited New Mexico at the end of August, beginning of September. I also arrived at the Albuquerque’s Sunport International Airport; international with no international flights – cute.

I loved New Mexico. I stayed at a friends farm in Cuba and spent a wonderful time on the mountains surrounding their property. I went hiking and drove an ATV up and down the well traveled paths. Wild horses roam around the farm and I had the pleasure of seeing them up close when they came close to the house for water. I visited Taos Pueblo and had the opportunity to see up close the structure of their reddish-brown adobe houses, and I learned about their culture and history. I did many other things but most of all, I will forever remember New Mexico’s amazing landscape, the mountains of all shapes and colors, the vast prairie and the sweet scent of sage.

New Mexico is indeed The Land of Enchantment.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 11, 2013 at 1:19 pm

Thanks for sharing your experiences, Nelly. We also visited Taos and the pueblo there. I’ll post some photos of that soon.

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avatar Patricia Weber October 11, 2013 at 3:55 pm

Lovely pictures Suzanne. We’ve never been there. It does however, for me, have some similar beauty to areas in Arizona. I love the whole southwest look. I can feel the dry air now!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 11, 2013 at 4:03 pm

The dry air seems to help people with certain lung problems and allergies. For those of us with dry skin—not so much. I never used so much moisturizer in my life. Also, for Northern New Mexico which is at relatively high altitude, sun block is a must—and sun glasses. The sunlight seems much more intense there. Thanks for your comment.

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avatar Pamela Heady October 11, 2013 at 5:04 pm

My husband and I love New Mexico! Especially Santa Fe, Taos, Red River and Albequerque! One of my favorite museums in SF is the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum which is about 2 blocks of the plaza. She is such an iconic artist who spent much of her life in that area. I also really enjoyed the Randall Davey Audubon Center which is located on Upper Canyon Road. There is also great craft beer in New Mexico and if you’re looking for something not spicy to eat, the Rooftop Pizzeria offers wonderful creations with the freshest ingredients!

I’ve attended multi-day music festivals in both Red River and Taos. Talk about a beautiful place to gather with several hundred (or more) of your closest friends to enjoy music for 2 or 3 days. It’s just fabulous.

My husband has lived in some not so glamorous parts of New Mexico like Portales and Roswell but all the places I’ve spent any time in, I’ve loved. Thanks for sharing your trip. I can’t wait to read about the rest of your journey.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 11, 2013 at 5:21 pm

It is so embarrassing. I think we are the only people who visited northern New Mexico and somehow managed to miss all Georgia O’Keefe exhibits!! Next time.

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avatar Dr. Johnny Velazquez October 11, 2013 at 7:07 pm

Great post! Santa Fe is marvelous! You must excuse my biased opinion, but I really love New Mexico. We resided in California for 34 years, an moved back in 06. No regrets. I have always said, that there are only three places worthy of mention. Heaven, New York(Brooklyn) and New Mexico. We live in Albuquerque, and frequent Santa Fe as often as we can. Thank you for your generous description of this unique place. Glad you were able to experience one of the best parts of the “Land of Enchantment.” You should visit during Balloon Fiesta, which runs during the first week of October. You would enjoy it tremendously! Good read. Blessings.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 11, 2013 at 10:42 pm

Thanks for stopping by. We were actually in Albuquerque for the first two days of the Balloon Fiesta, but we didn’t try to buck the traffic to go out to the launching field. Nonetheless, we were thrilled when two (probably errant) balloons floated over our downtown hotel. I hope they both got down safely. We heard about two that were injured after collisions with power lines.

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avatar Susan Cooper October 12, 2013 at 1:47 am

What a beautiful area filled with culture. I love all the colors and the architecture. 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 12, 2013 at 9:02 am

Thanks, Susan. We saw a demonstration of how they make and use adobe bricks. Very adaptive for the high desert environment.

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avatar Patti October 12, 2013 at 8:14 pm

I’m late to the game on this one! We drove through Santa Fe on our Route 66 trip and went back 1 year later and spent a week. Six of us rented a beautiful home for the week and we had a blast. We took a jeep tour out into the desert, the guys went fishing (and brought home some great fish stories) while the girls headed to the spa, we visited the Taos Pueblo and went white water rafting – only there wasn’t any white water – and we ate amazing meals every night – Santa Fe is a foodie town. My favorite place though was the Loretto Chapel, there is just something incredibly special in its history. Glad you made it to New Mexico and can check off another state from the list!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr October 19, 2013 at 4:34 pm

Thanks for stopping by, Patti. Unfortunately, my interior photos of the Loretto Chapel weren’t blog-worthy. But, if other Boomeresquers get the chance to visit there, I’ll leave you with this enticement to visit it: Miracle Staircase.

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avatar Sand In My Suitcase November 20, 2013 at 3:34 pm

Sangria, museums, walking tour – sounds like a good trip… We’ve not hit Sante Fe, but we’ll tuck the idea away :-).

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avatar Cez January 2, 2014 at 8:27 am

The moment I read the title I had to go and see if you met Billie and Steve – and you did! Although I never met them in person, we speak frequently via emails and skype – they are great.
I can’t wait to visit Santa Fe – it’s been long on my bucket list.

All the best in 2014 for you!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr January 2, 2014 at 8:31 am

One of the fun things about travel blogging is getting to meet other travel bloggers in person after getting to know them virtually. Billie and Steve’s blog helped me pick Northern New Mexico as a place to visit last year.

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avatar Jeri May 14, 2014 at 12:35 am

I can’t wait to go back to Sante Fe. Out of the three and a half days I was there, only a day and a half were spent in the city. Hubby and I got out to see Taos Pueblo, so some fly fishing, see the Rio Grande Gorge, hike to Chimney Rock at Ghost Ranch, as well as climb into the cliff dwellings at Bandelier National Monument. There’s so much to explore in the area, and I LOVE spicy food 🙂

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr May 19, 2014 at 5:49 pm

We didn’t get to see Bandelier National Monument because we visited during the Federal Government shutdown. Boo. Hiss.

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avatar noel September 21, 2014 at 11:18 pm

Its been too long since I’ve visited the area, it really is a lovely since and I also enjoy the architecture and art scene in Santa Fe,…hopefully 2015!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 22, 2014 at 1:15 am

I’m sure Billie and Steve will be happy to welcome you to their fair city.

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avatar santafetraveler September 22, 2014 at 10:26 am

We will! That goes for any fellow travel bloggers.

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avatar Betsy Wuebker | PassingThru September 21, 2014 at 11:26 pm

I was hoping this piece would mention that you’d met up with Billie. Santa Fe has been on my list for quite a while. I know what you mean about the dry heat. It’s embarrassing when all you can do is croak for a splash of water. Great photos. 🙂

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avatar santafetraveler September 22, 2014 at 10:23 am

We loved meeting up with Suzanne and Steve. Our Steve’s chatted as we talked travel blogging. It was a great evening.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 22, 2014 at 1:18 am

I’m really glad we finally made it to Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico and I feel like we need a return visit since the national parks were closed duting our trip.

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avatar Anita @ No Particular Place To Go September 22, 2014 at 8:26 am

I love New Mexico but, for some reason, have never visited Santa Fe, something that needs to be set to rights! The architecture in your photos is stunning and the opportunity to visit so many art galleries and museums would have us adding on extra days to our visit. And the food – we’d be heaping the chilies on!

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avatar santafetraveler September 22, 2014 at 10:24 am

If you love great architecture you’ll love Santa Fe, Anita. And there’s so much more. Come visit!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 22, 2014 at 4:10 pm

Anita, it sounds like Santa Fe would be your kind of town. We liked it better than Taos—more going on—although I realize that less going on is also a good thing too sometimes.

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avatar Michele Peterson September 22, 2014 at 9:35 am

It looks as though you made a wise choice with Inn of the Turquoise Bear…it looks very atmospheric. I’ve spent a lot of time in Taos but none in Santa fe so it’s interesting to read about your experiences. The combination of wildflowers and art makes it sound like a magical place.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 22, 2014 at 4:11 pm

We did enjoy our time in Santa Fe and at the Inn of the Turquoise Bear. It was close enough to the center of town to be able to walk everywhere, but far enough away for some tranquility.

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avatar The Gypsynesters September 22, 2014 at 7:36 pm

Santa Fe is a great place for a getaway, love the museums and galleries! We have taken advantage several times. One of America’s truly unique cities.

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avatar Leigh September 22, 2014 at 9:27 pm

I agree that’s it wonderful to finally meet the people you’ve been conversing with online. You crack me up with your dry wit – and loved reading the bits about just getting to Santa Fe. I lived in Boulder for years so made many trips to Santa Fe – and all were wonderful. I remember a great – not too spicy meal – at the Inn of the Anazasi and a wonderful meal at Geronimo’s for our 20th anniversary.
Hope you’re feeling better now.

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avatar Jackie Humphries Smith September 23, 2014 at 11:04 am

We have been nudging a return trip to Santa Fe to our travel list. Last time we went, The Scout was at a legal conference and I came later to join him. . .my route was to Albuquerque and I set out in the rental car and nearly missed the turn off to Santa Fe. . .everything was flat and tan and the entire town blended into the landscape (which is a nice thing unless you are looking for it and nightfall is approaching)! Loved your review —

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 23, 2014 at 5:01 pm

Santa Fe would be a great place for a conference. Actually, when we were there, there were two Social Security Administrative Law Judges from Tennessee on the same tour who were there for an ALJ conference. It was a little freaky because that’s the type of law I did/do—so there we were discussing federal regulations on the street in Santa Fe.

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avatar Sue Reddel September 24, 2014 at 6:01 pm

Nice review of Santa Fe. I’ve wanted to get there for years. I know I would just love the galleries, art and landscape.

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avatar Michelle September 25, 2014 at 9:34 am

I have not been to Santa Fe, but I’ve been to Albuquerque which I really liked. Santa Fe does look really pretty and I love the architecture. It definitely sounds like there is a lot to do and twenty dollars to visit five museums is a great deal!

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avatar alison @GreenWithRenvy September 25, 2014 at 12:45 pm

i’ve always wanted to visit Santa Fe Suzanne, and you’ve certain highlighted some great spots to see. I especially love the wind sculptures in the garden. The architecture is so different from anything in New England. I think the Folk Art Festival on 2015 is calling my name!

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avatar Robin June 14, 2017 at 4:38 pm

I really want to go to Santa Fe after reading your article. More than a travel guide, this gave me a spot-on view and I got the flavor of the town. I’m a regular to your blog Suzanne and I won’t hesitate to ask for your guidance for this and any other trip. Besides the personal experience, you do a great job with the research.

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