Boomeresque:Definition
1. Adj.: Describing a person born between 1 Jan. 1946 and 31 Dec. 1964
2. Adj.: Description of a person, place or thing possessing Baby Boomer je ne sais quoi
3. See also, Boomer, Esq.: A Baby Boomer who is also a licensed attorney (See, e.g., About).

The High Road to Taos, New Mexico

by Suzanne Fluhr on December 13, 2013 · 76 comments

San Francisco de Asis Church, Rancho de Taos, New Mexico

After our visit to New Mexico’s capital town city, Santa Fe, we remounted our rented Ford Fiesta for the drive northeast to Taos, New Mexico. From my reading, I knew that the drive on the High Road to Taos from Santa Fe  is part of the there — there. The 56 mile route officially starts at Pojoaque, northeast of Santa Fe. The road is usually only two lanes and it winds up and down hilly terrain. It is best to devote at least half a day for the trip, depending on how often you might want to stop.

San Francisco de Asis Church, Rancho de Taos, New Mexico

San Francisco de Asis Church, Rancho de Taos, New Mexico built in the early 1800’s in adobe by Franciscan priests. It proclaims itself the most photographed and painted church in the world. (Photo credit. Wikimedia, Travis K. Witt).

My husband, Steve, and I do not rarely argue. (Some people think this is unhealthy, but that is a subject for another blog post—perhaps on a different blog). Unkind words are most likely to be exchanged when he is driving and I am riding shotgun as the navigator. I am so anxious not to exasperate Mr. Excitement that I think I am sometimes over-prepared. On this trip, I assumed the passenger seat gripping Fodor’s Guide to Santa Fe, Taos and Albuquerque which devotes some six pages to “The High Road to Taos,” and includes a map. I also had a real paper map from the car rental place and I had enabled Google maps on Steve’s I-phone.

I highly recommend that you embark on the High Road to Taos drive with some GPS enabled device. Even though the route has been officially designated as a New Mexico Scenic Byway, there were missing road signs. We drove through the 8,000 feet high mountain town of Truchas only to find ourselves on a dirt road through some fields. We figured that the need to drive on an unpaved road was something the Fodor’s guide definitely would have mentioned, so we back tracked, this time listening to Ms. GoogleMaps, telling us where to make the right angle turn onto the road to Peñasco. As we passed several other lost looking tourist types driving the wrong way towards the same dirt road, Steve finally believed my strident assertion that there had been no sign designating the turn. Later during the ride, when we came to an unmarked fork in the road, we were spared having to look for moss on the north side of trees by Ms. GoogleMaps who kept us pointed in the right direction.

Fodor’s provides the following directions from Santa Fe:

U.S. 285/84 north to NM 503 (a right turn just past Pojoaque), to County Road 98 (a left toward Chiamayó), to NM 76 northeast to NM 75 east, to NM 518 north.

Got that? The first part of the “High Road” takes you through an arid high desert where, if you’re a Baby Boomer, you can imagine John Wayne and his posse riding out from behind a rock formation. Indeed, this was a popular place to film Westerns back in the day. This type of topography is known as “badlands“. I imagine this is because if you were trying to cross them in an oxen drawn covered wagon, you might be wondering, “And I thought this was a good idea — because why?” In a car with a decent transmission you will be more inclined to admire the scenery.

High desert on the High Road to Taos from Santa Fe, New Mexico

High desert on the High Road to Taos from Santa Fe, New Mexico

We stopped for lunch at Rancho de Chimayó which is a right turn off the road. There was a Road Scholar tour bus parked there and quite a few cars in the parking lot, but the place was roomy enough to accommodate that group and drop-ins like us, especially because it was a nice enough day for us to eat outside on the covered patio. Our meals were not particularly memorable, but surpassed what we could have eaten at road-side fast food emporia. (Disclosure: I don’t eat chile which is pretty much a non-starter for enjoying the full breadth of New Mexican cuisine). If you are afraid to choose not to deviate from the main route, your lunch options are limited.

During the ride, you will experience “reverse” ecosystems in that the treeless high desert is at lower elevation than the pine forests you encounter as you drive further into the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Much of the ride is through the Carson National Forest. If you like to hike, there seemed to be quite a few trail heads. When we were there, they were “closed” by an ill-advised and extremely annoying federal government shutdown. In the event your nicotine patch isn’t working, please do not dispose of any matches or lit cigarettes out your car window. The area is prone to forest fires and evidence of past conflagrations is visible from time to time.

Carson National Forest on the High Road to Taos Scenic Byway

Carson National Forest on the High Road to Taos Scenic Byway

Soak in the scenery along your drive. The High Road to Taos drops you off on a commercial strip road into Taos where beautiful vistas are replaced by big box stores and chain restaurants. If you have spent your drive on the High Road to Taos dreaming of a fried shrimp platter at Red Lobster — you’re in luck.

Should you go?:  If you are doing a loop of the major “must sees” in northern New Mexico, chances are that you will be driving between Santa Fe and Taos. The “low road” is also quite picturesque, traveling along the Rio Grande River. However, the High Road to Taos Scenic Byway provides the opportunity to experience both the natural beauty of the area along with opportunities to interact with the art (traditional weaving and wood carving) and the old Hispanic culture of this part of of the state. Caveat: On a poor weather day, driving this route could be unpleasant and even dangerous. For more in depth trip planning along the High Road to Taos, check out this article by the Santa Fe Travelers.

(This post is now part of a collection of blog posts about beautiful road trips at Travel World Online.)

Do you enjoy road trips? Which is your favorite — in the U.S. or elsewhere? If you have driven the High Road to Taos, do you have any additional recommendations? 

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{ 74 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar santafetravelerssanta December 13, 2013 at 1:26 pm

Thanks for including us in your post. You should have used us instead of Fodors! Caveat- many GPS systems flat out don’t work in NM. Perhaps, they’ve been updated, but… If you look carefully for the signs, you’ll get there! It’s even more challenging coming from Taos to Santa Fe. I recommend to people that they go up on the High Road and back on the low- though there are people who will tell you the opposite. Great views either way.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 14, 2013 at 4:34 am

Billie. I swear there were two places with NO SIGNS. Google Maps on Steve’s I Phone seemed to work ok.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 13, 2013 at 2:43 pm

Thanks, Billie. Folks, if you are visiting northern New Mexico, you definitely want to do some pre-travel research using the Santa Fe Travelers website and blog.

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avatar santafetravelerssanta December 13, 2013 at 3:13 pm

And they can hire us to plan the entire trip and supply guides. We love designing an itinerary unique to the traveler.

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avatar Mike December 14, 2013 at 5:33 am

I have been a road trip lover all of my life. My father (on the weekends and his teaching breaks) and I were constantly traveling. Then with the combined family we did the same thing. The one thing I miss is being a passenger so I can see everything. If I could just get Phoenix to be able to reach the pedals we might be on to something. I am so intrigued by the different ecosystems here, Suzanne. The Sierra Nevada mountains flowing into the Nevada desert are the exact same way. And gosh forbid, please avoid fires of these precious lands. There is NOTHING unhealthy about rarely arguing. I loath arguing and will steer a direct path around it. And in my blogging and reading thousands upon thousands of blog posts this past year. I discovered I’m one of the healthiest people I know and that is a huge sign of success from my “colorful” childhood. Great post as always, our friend! 🙂

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 14, 2013 at 5:41 am

Thanks, Mike. You live near some spectacular scenery too—for sure. I agree. I think arguing is highly over-rated. So I’m not sure how I ended up as a lawyer—-basically, an arguer for hire.

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avatar Montecristo Travels (Sonja) December 14, 2013 at 7:06 am

Your caveat cracked me up!! 🙂 Looks like something to put on our list!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 14, 2013 at 9:19 am

I’m pretty sure that caveat was my knee jerk mother response — you know, you couldn’t possibly have enough judgment not to drive off into the mountains during a snowstorm, so I have to tell you. (Ask my boys).

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avatar Jacqueline Gum (Jacquie) December 14, 2013 at 7:07 am

I loved this post! Mostly because I have never been to New Mexico, yet it’s one of those places I keep promising myself I will see. The pictures are beautiful :)And it flat out made me laugh…that you rarely argue!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hahahaha! Great metaphor Suzanne…taking the high road and all 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 14, 2013 at 9:20 am

Touche, Jacquie. Why didn’t I think of that metaphor when I was writing this? Perfect.

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avatar Leslie in Portland, Oregon December 14, 2013 at 3:07 pm

When I was a child, we drove from Portland, Oregon to central eastern Alberta to visit my grandparents several times, and those remain my favorite road trips. The best route took us through all kinds of topography and climates, culminating with breathtaking drives through Glacier, Waterton Lakes, Banff and Jasper National Parks. Of course as glorious as those parks were, nothing could beat the thrill of driving up to our grandparent’s farmhouse at the end of the trip!

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 14, 2013 at 3:41 pm

Leslie, that sounds like a gorgeous route. Our drive to visit my grandparents in Brooklyn, New York was the lovely New Jersey turnpike 😉 And our car always broke down or got a flat tire.

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avatar Neva Fels December 15, 2013 at 1:39 pm

What a fun and beautiful drive you took. The only person/thing my husband argues with is our GPS. It’s always been right and the only way my husband gets a “one-up-manship” is finding two ways to get to a destination and taking the opposite one the GPS wants.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 15, 2013 at 3:59 pm

Neva, maybe your husband’s “disagreements” with the GPS is some type of digital age version of the guy who refuses to stop and ask for directions.

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avatar Patti December 15, 2013 at 5:42 pm

We took the low rode to Taos and while not as environmentally exciting, it is very pretty as it follows the river. We didn’t get to spend much time in Taos as most of our afternoon was spent at the pueblo which was wonderful! Our GPS is serving us well as we travel the country but she does get confused at times if we make a turn she doesn’t agree with and then can’t figure out how to get us back on track – and her pronunciation of some street names is hilarious.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 15, 2013 at 10:38 pm

We once had a GPS in a rental car that actually sounded annoyed if you deviated from where she thought you should be going — “Recalculating”. Yes, they do come up with some strange pronunciations, but for people with let’s say, worse than fair senses of direction, GPS for driving is a miracle.

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avatar Patti December 18, 2013 at 6:50 pm

Abi always jokes that one of these days the GPS is going to yell at us, “I told you to turn left you idiot!” 😉

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avatar Roz Warren December 15, 2013 at 9:26 pm

Do I enjoy road trips? Nope. But I do enjoy looking at photos of other people’s road trips. Thanks for some lovely scenery.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 15, 2013 at 10:39 pm

Roz, thanks for getting past the title to the photos.

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avatar Eden Rudin December 16, 2013 at 12:57 am

Wow, thank you for taking us along on the drive, I just love those drives where the scenery takes such drastic changes. And I think almost any women who sits in the passenger seat with the map feels the same way, lol and they never do believe us till they see others do the same exact thing. Gotta love our men 😉

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 7:24 am

I’m glad to learn we’re not the only couple with that car dynamic. Ironically, I have the best sense of direction in my family of origen. Admittedly, it is a very low bar 😉

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avatar Patricia Weber December 16, 2013 at 8:01 am

My husband and I are both on the same page: for the most part we don’t enjoy road trips anymore.That’s likely because when we lived in upstate NY, our road trips for the holidays were down from Plattsburgh’s 5 to 6 foot snowbanks over to Pittsburg PA and Long Island NY to spend holidays with EACH family where there were just 1 to 2 foot snowbanks. Loved reading your post about New Mexico travels.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 9:23 am

Yeah. I must day that road tripping through the snow (Eben to the proverbial grandmother’s house) is a drag. Through the ice and the dreaded wintery mix—-even worse. Thanks for stopping by.

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avatar Catarina December 16, 2013 at 8:28 am

Have never been to New Mexico but must say your great pictures makes me interested in going. Sounds like a nice trip.

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avatar Dr. Johnny Velazquez December 21, 2013 at 12:48 am

Hi Catarina. You need to visit New Mexico. I guarantee, that you will love it.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 9:25 am

New Mexico is a nice state to visit in the U.S. It definitely has a different vibe (and cuisine) than the northeast where we live.

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avatar Greg December 16, 2013 at 11:09 am

Hi Suzanne,

Dying at how clever your domain name is.

You boomers aren’t elephants in the room, you just need a little help with basic computer functions 🙂

I wonder what my generation’s grand flaw will be…(actual time lapse while googling what generation I am a part of, it’s Y) wait I just found it – we all think we’re special!

Thanks for spurring some really good thoughts,

Greg

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 1:05 pm

Greg, it would be helpful if our tech questions didn’t result in eye-rolling by our Millennial children. But, here you are, commenting on my blog. My mother (a charter member of the Greatest Generation) doesn’t even know what a blog is — eye roll 😉

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avatar Doreen Pendgracs December 16, 2013 at 12:44 pm

Aren’t roadtrips fun? You never know what you might encounter — or not … if you’re lost!

It is indeed important for both driver and navigator to remain calm, as no one wins if both parties are upset and frazzled at a wrong turn — or missing a turn!

My most aggravating road trip was in the Basque Country of Spain. I don’t speak Spanish, but at least I had a map. However, that didn’t help, as the roadsigns were all in the Basque language, and none of the locals spoke English OR Spanish.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 1:02 pm

Doreen, traveling where you can’t even read the alphabet which we are about to do in southeast Asia is even more trying. Still, if the alternative is not traveling, I’ll continue to “happily” get lost.

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avatar A.K.Andrew December 16, 2013 at 12:46 pm

I have been on this road and New Mexico has a v. special place in my heart. But I had to laugh as we had the exact same experience on the dirt road, and also past another lost car. Locals must think we’re all fools I’m sure. But it really is an incredible bit of scenery and I love the photos you shared. Thanks for the post, and glad to have found your blog:-)

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 12:55 pm

Personally, I think the locals have a hand in the missing sign. If the sign were there, visitors (tourists) would not drive through the entire main street of Truchas, they would turn off before they got through most of the town. Jus’ sayin’.

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avatar Steve Grogan December 16, 2013 at 1:49 pm

I made my way through New Mexico a few times as an over-the-road truck driver. Great scenery. I just wish I could have stopped to enjoy it more, but the freight had to get there on time!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 2:45 pm

Thanks for stopping by. It must be more enjoyable being an over the road truck driver through New Mexico, than, say up and down the New Jersey turnpike.

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avatar Leigh December 16, 2013 at 3:54 pm

I’ve done that drive several times and it never gets old. I’ve just come back from a trip in California where I had to drive & navigate myself – sometimes at night – so broke down and used a GPS for the first time. It saved my proverbial bacon getting into and out of LA & San Francisco.

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avatar Krystyna Lagowski December 16, 2013 at 9:19 pm

Do you know how funny you are? I love your dry, sardonic wit. The crossed out words are a hoot. I agree, road trips are a wonderful way to see the country but you have to be well prepared and know who you’re travelling with. One day I want to drive through the desert, and your descriptions are encouraging. Lovely pics, too!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 9:34 pm

Thanks, Krystyna. It’s good to know that at least one person is amused by my “sardonic” wit. I think I might have inherited a touch of irreverence from my father.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 16, 2013 at 9:22 pm

Thanks for stopping by, Leigh. I was an early GPS adopter. When you’re on the road alone in a new city, it’s
definitely a challenge to drive and navigate at the same time, especially in my home town of Philadelphia where a good number of the streets no longer have signs.

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avatar Jason B December 17, 2013 at 11:01 am

Sounds like you had a great road trip. I love road trips as well. My favorite so far was my I-10 trip that I did earlier this year.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 17, 2013 at 11:12 am

Thanks, Jason. I followed along on your road trip.

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avatar Susan Cooper December 17, 2013 at 2:01 pm

You are so funny. It make the read fun and interesting. This is an area I haven’t yet visited. It’s on my short list of things to do. I love the desert area and all it’s stark beauty. Santa Fe is the first place I want the visit and then Taos. Your post has only given me the urge to go sooner rather then later. 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 17, 2013 at 3:38 pm

Susan, as an artist, I think you would really enjoy northern New Mexico and especially Santa Fe and Taos.

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avatar Oksana Frewer December 17, 2013 at 3:12 pm

I’ve never been to this place, this church looks so interesting to me. It would be nice to see this place with my own eyes and feel the atmosphere ! Thank You.

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avatar Donna Hull December 17, 2013 at 3:17 pm

Thanks for bringing back memories of my drive on the High Road to Taos. Next time, you’ll have to take the Enchanted Circle Highway (I think the High Road is part of it) all the way around. It’s one of my favorite drives.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 17, 2013 at 3:39 pm

Thanks for the suggestion about the Enchanted Circle, Donna.

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avatar Jeri December 17, 2013 at 9:52 pm

Sante Fe is definitely on my bucket list, mainly because I started learning more about the town when I fell in love with a certain artist’s work 😉 I’ll definitely keep the Road to Taos in mind when I finally get the chance to spend some time in New Mexico.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 17, 2013 at 10:28 pm

Thanks for stopping by, Jeri. I hope you make it to new Mexico in the not too distant future.

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avatar Michele Peterson December 18, 2013 at 8:49 am

I just love Taos so much and your photos brought back many good memories. I rarely drive when home in Toronto or Mexico but it’s a real pleasure in New Mexico where there is jaw-dropping scenery around every turn. One thing I learned when driving between Santa Fe or Albuquerque and Taos is to make sure you get a car with some power. I had a tiny little rental car and it had trouble making it up some hills. The radio stations play great country or ranchero music which adds to the experience.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 18, 2013 at 12:58 pm

Thanks, Michelle. You are right. Our rental Ford Fiesta was a little on the under powered side, but we managed. If you will be driving around northern New Mexico in any kind of inclement weather, it might be wise to seriously considered renting an SUV with 4 wheel drive. Your comment about the radio stations is also accurate—if you enjoy that type of music.

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avatar Michelle da Silva Richmond December 18, 2013 at 9:08 am

Great article! That’s an area of the US I’ve always wanted to visit. Thanks so much for your insight.

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avatar Pamela Heady December 18, 2013 at 2:55 pm

I actually think I know that spot you’re talking about where all of a sudden you’re on a dirt path wondering if you’re about to fall off the grid! Happened to me and yep, we turned around and figured out the way and landed into Taos without issue. It is a beautiful drive and what was more fun was to listen to a singer/songwriter friend of mine who had recorded an album titled “The High Road to Taos” while traveling that very stretch of road. (His name is Michael Hearne by the way!)

I love New Mexico and have been able to see much of the state. What fun to revisit that trip in my mind with your post!

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 18, 2013 at 4:44 pm

Thanks for confirming that I didn’t just miss the sign!

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avatar Meredith Wouters December 19, 2013 at 1:43 pm

What a great assessment! I live in Albuquerque, know the area well, and this summer found myself in exactly the same predicament as you! To our chagrin, we were pulling a camper, and heading up a caravan of 5 families. Imagine all of us attempting that turn around where we missed the sign. Once we survived that, I found myself wishing everyone could come and see our beautiful scenery. It’s off the beaten path, but worth the drive!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 19, 2013 at 1:49 pm

There is no sign! I rest my case. 😉

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avatar Suzanne (Travelbunny) December 19, 2013 at 6:38 pm

I’ve been reading a lot about Mexico on the Boomer blogs lately and it’s becoming more and more appealing. Beautiful scenery captured in your excellent photography Suzanne.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 19, 2013 at 11:08 pm

These photos are of NEW Mexico. Mexico is nice too.http://www.boomeresque.com/mexico-san-miguel-de-allende-2012/

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avatar Cassi December 20, 2013 at 12:33 am

I like road trips as the passenger. We haven’t been on many so I don’t have a favorite. I’d like to be able to travel more.

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avatar Dr. Johnny Velazquez December 21, 2013 at 12:46 am

I really enjoyed this post. We live in Albuquerque, and my wife is from the Pojoaque area. The name comes from the Tewa dialect, and the natives spell the name, Posuwaegeh. Pojoaque means, “Drink- Water Place. I am a New York transplant, but love this place.
During the Summer season, we visit Santa Fe, Taos, Chama, and other parts of northern
NM. It is a very fascinating place. Thank you for posting such an amusing experience.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 21, 2013 at 1:18 pm

It really is an interesting place; beautiful and the confluence of 3 cultures (Native American, Hispanic and American).

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avatar northierthanthou December 21, 2013 at 4:08 am

That certainly is a beautiful area; the food in Santa Fe is particularly wonderful. Taos Pueblo is always worth a visit if you can squeeze in the trip.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 21, 2013 at 1:19 pm

I’ll be doing a post about Taos Pueblo. Our visit there was one of the highlights of our trip, especially because Bandelier National Park (cliff dwellings) was closed due to the Federal government shutdown in October.

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avatar Michele Harvey December 21, 2013 at 3:26 pm

I love New Mexico both because of its natural beauty and it’s Native American and Spanish cultural influences. It is interesting that San Francisco de Asis Church proclaims itself to be the most photographed church in the world. The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta is also the most photographed event in the world. I lived for a short time in Albuquerque and have been to both Santa Fe and Taos, but never on the high road. I guess that’s a good reason to go back for a visit.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr December 21, 2013 at 3:52 pm

I was thinking that maybe the Cathedral of Notre Dame or Sacre Couer or the Vatican might dispute St. Francis of Asis’ assertion about being the most photographed church in the world. 😉

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avatar Pat Amsden December 21, 2013 at 9:31 pm

Road trips with the right partner can be fun.

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avatar Niekka McDonald December 23, 2013 at 11:53 am

This trip looks amazing! The scenery is breathtaking. Thank you for sharing with us and I love your metaphor for taking the high road.

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avatar Madaline Fluhr December 23, 2013 at 1:32 pm

Hi, there, sis – Though tardy on posting a comment – I have really enjoyed reading your post and all the comments following! First of all, getting lost on a “road trip” must have made you nostalgic as hec for every road trip we had the pleasure to be taken on by dear old Dad, whether it was from Phila. to New York City, or Philadelphia to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. When you say the bar for “sense of direction” in our family is low – you flatter us. Perhaps “nonexistent” would be more accurate. I feel the invention of the GPS has added at least 10 years to my life due to stress reduction. I love road trips to anywhere (beautiful scenery is a wonderful bonus) because I love being physically captive away from the usual chaotic routines and responsibilities!! I feel like “they can’t find me…or get to me” I feel free, free, free at last! A feeling of being blissfully anonymous and unmoored blooms within me. Thanks to Dad’s wanderlust – I have many beautiful visual memories – the badlands, the Rockies, scenic Mt. Rushmore, the blue mountains of Amish country on the way to Lighthouse Art and Music Camp each summer, the apocalyptic oil refineries of the NJ turnpike…and on all of our family trips I remember you hunched over a map in the front passenger seat, navigating. God help us, if you hadn’t been! So, I love road trips!

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) December 23, 2013 at 2:34 pm

Hey, Mads. Thanks for stopping by. Nowadays with mobile technology, it’s much harder to be “out of touch”. Thanks for validating my navigation “issues”.

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avatar Becc December 30, 2013 at 12:50 am

Thank you for the information. This is definitely on my bucket list 🙂

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avatar Christina January 4, 2014 at 4:51 am

Great article with beautiful picture.
I found your site because of the blogparade at travelworldonline.
I wrote a piece about a road trip to the Lavender route in the beautiful Provence/France.

Have a great New Year 2014.
Christina

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avatar Billie September 12, 2016 at 1:21 am

I write about the High Road more than the average bear as I live in the town- er city of Santa Fe. It’s refreshing to see a different take on it. We were actually there yesterday and had lunch at Rancho de Chimayo. We love it there! What I love is that the same family has owned it for over 50 years, it’s in an old family home and there’s a lot of history and culture that comes with the meal. If someone is looking to be wowed by haute cuisine, this isn’t the place, but they do a great job with traditional NM cuisine using old family recipes. It is very touristy, but locals also eat there all the time. Sundays, especially, many extended families seem to eat there after Mass. There are a lot of road changes on the High Road, but if you look carefully, they really are all marked, unless someone stole the signs.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr September 12, 2016 at 6:56 am

I swear, the turn to Penasco in Trucha wasn’t marked. Either that, or we and a bunch of other cars that ended up on a dirt road in a field had group blindness. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. 😉

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avatar Michele Peterson September 12, 2016 at 9:04 am

I love Taos and enjoyed hiking solo in the Carson National Forest although perhaps next time I’ll keep in mind that it gets dark fast in New Mexico. But what skies!

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avatar Donna Janke September 12, 2016 at 5:09 pm

I want to make the trip from Santa Fe to Taos one day, whether it be by the high road or the low road or both. If we take the high road, I will make sure we are well prepared.

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avatar The GypsyNesters September 13, 2016 at 12:53 pm

Been to Taos by both roads, but not in a long time. Love each of them.

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