Boomeresque:Definition
1. Adj.: Describing a person born between 1 Jan. 1946 and 31 Dec. 1964
2. Adj.: Description of a person, place or thing possessing Baby Boomer je ne sais quoi
3. See also, Boomer, Esq.: A Baby Boomer who is also a licensed attorney (See, e.g., About).

Hawaii Quilt Guild Show: E Ho’onanea I Ka Mili Kapa

by Suzanne Fluhr on April 7, 2014 · 81 comments

Pineapple Quilt at the Hawaii Quilt Guild Show

Hawaii Quilt Guild Exhibit Brochure for Honolulu quilt show(Updated on March 27, 2015).

E Ho’ononea I Ka Mili Kapa Got that? I didn’t think so. It was the theme of the 2014 quilt exhibit by The Hawaii Quilt Guild at the Honolulu Museum of Art School. The translation from Hawaiian is “Come and Be Soothed by the Quilting”. After some unpleasantness regarding my health, I was more than ready to be soothed by the quilting and this delightful display was just was what the doctor (my husband, Mr. Dr. Excitement) ordered.

Dr. Excitement and I are not new to quilting. In fact, part of the way we earned our  ironic nickname, Mr. and Mrs. Excitement, was by working together to hand sew a king size patchwork quilt during the first year of our marriage—when we were 20-somethings. This horrified impressed our family and friends with our wild and crazy lifestyle. I still have my own “stash” of fabric, waiting for me to cut, piece and quilt. Many quilters will freely admit their addiction to collecting fabric. They refer to their supply as their “stash”. (Note: When passing through customs at any national border, it’s advisable to call it something else.)

In 2014, the Hawaii Quilt Guild was celebrating its 30th anniversary. We were captivated as soon as we walked in the door. Attending this quilt exhibit was an excellent way to become  re-inspired to finally finish the partially completed quilt project lurking in my closet. (Raise your hand if you have one too).

 quilt exhibit wall, displaying the work of featured artist, Margaret Teruya.

This is part of the quilt exhibit wall, displaying the work of featured artist, Margaret Teruya.

Abstract Quilt by Margaret Teruya at Honolulu Quilt Show

I was drawn to the colors in this abstract non-traditional quilt by Margaret Teruya.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(OK. You can put your hand down now). In addition to the display of 134 quilts by Guild members, the show highlighted the work of featured artist, Margaret Teruya. In the exhibit guide booklet, she described how she found the rules and patterns of traditional quilting too confining. Not willing to abandon the craft, she started using quilting techniques such as piecing and applique (both stitched and fused) to bring her initial rough sketches to life. Her creations can best be described as fabric collages. Unfortunately, some of her works hung too high on the wall for me to photograph. One of these was her composition dedicated to Japan’s nightmare tsunami which I found particularly evocative and moving.

With its monthly quilting groups, the Hawaii Quilt Guild continues a long tradition in many cultures of people (traditionally it was women) gathering together to share their skills, assistance, encouragement and enjoyment of quilt making.

Unfortunately, you missed the 2014 Hawaii Quilt Guild’s exhibit in Honolulu. However, you’re in time for the 2015 exhibit to be held from May 8th through May 17th, 2015 at the Honolulu Museum School of Art.  The 2015 theme is Aia ka Pu’uwai i Ku’u ‘Ohana, “My Heart is With My Family”. The Featured Artist will be Shirfeir Sunada. The Honolulu Museum School of Art is located at 1111 Victoria Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96814. Gallery hours are Tues-Sat, 10AM – 4:30PM. Sun, 1-5PM. The gallery is closed on Mondays. And oh yeah, IT’S FREE! For more information about the Guild and the show, you can check their website here.

To whet your appetite, here are some of the quilts we admired at the 2014 quilt exhibit:

Hawaiian Style Quilt

Hand Stitched Hawaiian Style Quilt using applique–Most are monochromatic, but not this one.

Close up of Hand Sewn Hawaiian Quilting Stiches

Close up detail showing the tiny hand stitches that fill the large quilt above.

Patchwork Quilt a the Hawaii Quilt Guild Show

Patchwork quilt constructed of pieced squares.

Pineapple Quilt at the Hawaii Quilt Guild Show

A quilt using traditional quilting techniques with a Hawaiian theme. Machine quilted.

Quilt from the Hawaii Quilt Guild show Honolulu

This quilter used traditional patchwork to create an untraditional design.

Have you ever sewn a quilt (or part of a quilt)? Do you think you would have the patience to do this type of craft? Have you ever been to a quilt exhibit?

{ 79 comments… read them below or add one }

Jacqueline Gum (Jacquie) April 7, 2014 at 7:08 am

I think these are absolutely gorgeous!!!! Of all the places in the world where one would think quilting holds such importance, it would NOT be Hawaii! And I spent quite a bit of time there, because my mother lived in Honolulu for 20 years…never heard of this. Fascinating!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 7:21 am

I don’t know how old the tradition is, but there are a lot of people selling “Hawaiian” style quilts in Hawaii these days. The Hawaiian style is usually a big stylized flower or plant which is attached as applique to a white background which is then quilted. They usually just have the white background and the applique is one other color. In any case, the show was really enjoyable—just a few Hawaiian quilts, but then quilts of every size and style. Having done a tiny bit of quilting, I know how much work they take—even for a machine stitched quilt.

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paul graham April 7, 2014 at 9:38 am

Quilts are a great form of folk art and these look truly excellent. I had not thought of Hawaii in terms of this medium but on reflection I suppose it really is global. Great that you are back to upbeat though it really seemed you handled rhe setback with a positive attitude.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 10:17 pm

Thanks, Paul. I am finally feeling much improved. Quilting is definitely a folk art that transcends cultures—from the Amish to native Hawaiians. It has also become a fine art as fabric/textile artists adopt and adapt it’s techniques and designs.

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Catarina April 7, 2014 at 10:15 am

Nice quilts, Suzanne. Honestly had no idea they made quilts on Hawaii, so it was interesting to learn.

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Beth Niebuhr April 7, 2014 at 10:26 am

Beautiful quilts. I made a little quilt when I was a little girl. My 4th grade teacher taught us to do it. The girls. I helped organize an antique quilt show and wrote the booklet we gave out as part of the ticket price.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 10:39 pm

In order for me to try my hand at quilting, I had to block out my experience trying to learn to sew in junior high school. My. worst. grade. ever. from. first. through.12th.grade. 😉

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Irene S. Levine April 7, 2014 at 10:54 am

Surprised, too, to learn of quilting in Hawaii. How did you find out about the show?

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 10:43 pm

I read about the show in the local paper. I was really glad we went. I thought Steve was just humoring me by agreeing to attend, but he really enjoyed it to. The work was amazing. Since I’ve tried my hand at quilting, I realize how much work it takes.

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Neva @ Retire for the Fun of it April 7, 2014 at 11:47 am

I would’ve enjoyed seeing these beautifully crafted quilts, Especially the tribute to the Tsunami survivors and victims. I’m always impressed with the time involved for hand sewing.

My grand-daughter is interested in sewing and wants to do a Quillow (Pillow/Quilt), since she likes to cuddle up in the one I made for the family.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 10:45 pm

I can’t even imagine how long it took to hand quilt the Hawaiian themed quilt (the white one with flowers) that I shared in my post’s photos. I hand quilted a 9 patch square and even that took me a long time — not to mention all the times I stuck my finger since all work done underneath the cover is done blind.

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Donna Janke April 7, 2014 at 12:18 pm

These quilts are amazing. I am always impressed when I see the art quilters create. I do not get along well with a sewing machine or a needle and know I wouldn’t have the patience for this. I admire those who do.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 10:55 pm

I can’t even imagine how long it took to hand quilt the Hawaiian themed quilt (the white one with flowers) that I shared in my post’s photos. I hand quilted a 9 patch square and even that took me a long time — not to mention all the times I stuck my finger since all work done underneath the cover is done blind.

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Lisa Richardson April 7, 2014 at 1:52 pm

I’ve noticed a quilt shop on Kauai, and quilted linens for sale in Hawaii. It is so much work, and they are pricey. The quilts you show, particularly the bright one with anthurium and also the pineapples-are stunning. Better get stitching with Dr. Excitement, and add some Hawaii to your piece!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 7, 2014 at 11:01 pm

I learned something from your comment—-anthurium —-I had no idea what the flower was. In order to make a true Hawaiian quilt, I’d have to learn to applique.

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Anita @ No Particular Place To Go April 7, 2014 at 2:46 pm

Wow! I used to quilt (beginner level only) years ago and loved creating different patterns and playing with the fabrics but these quilts take the craft to a whole new level! Awesome artwork! I especially loved the abstract quilt that looked like it had been created underwater – reminded me of batik artwork. Thanks for sharing these photos.

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Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 3:48 am

In the quilt you referred to by the show’s featured artist, she did, in fact, use some batik fabrics.

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nan @ lbddiaries April 7, 2014 at 3:06 pm

When we lived in Vermont there was a yearly craft fair on the Commons. I could have wandered forever. There we found THE most amazing, non-traditional tie-died looking quilt and fell in love. It was an African Batik fabric with swirls of purples, lavenders, etc., and is the most we ever paid for a quilt. It is still beautiful to this day and we still get comments on it. I was never a traditional quilt type person, probably because I grew up with them. I am not talented so don’t make. BUT those who don’t make, buy!!

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Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 3:53 am

Excellent point about those of us who can’t make, buying. I also think that unlike other bed coverings, we become attached to our quilts, so we take good care of them.

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santafetraveler April 7, 2014 at 3:41 pm

Amazing quilts- I love quilt art.

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noel April 7, 2014 at 4:00 pm

That is a beautiful show…we have quite a few quilting shows here in Hawaii since it is a popular craft…I have even made one and only one since I’ve realized how really time consuming it is to do.

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Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 3:55 am

Noel, you’re lucky to have photography as your avocation. You’re right about quilting taking a lot of time. I’m also finding that my vision is not what it used to be. I now understand why my grandmother always asked me to thread her needle for her.

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Tim April 7, 2014 at 4:47 pm

That’s a very humorous and engaging commentary on a subject I know little about. I have no stash of fabric. That said, I do have an appreciation for the effort involved in producing these art works and enjoyed very much your post. Tim

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Nancie April 7, 2014 at 5:19 pm

Hi Suzanne! I am not a quilter, but I do love them. There are some beauties here. My grandmother was a quilter and she made each of her 25 granddaughters a quilt. I still have mine. One of these days I want to have it restored. Here’s to you getting your quilting project finished!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 8:19 pm

Nancie—I love that tradition. I know many people who treasure the quilts their mothers and grandmothers made for them.

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Meredith Wouters April 7, 2014 at 5:33 pm

Amazing quilts! I have a friend who will love this post. And I laughed out loud at your warning about your “stash.”

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Jay April 7, 2014 at 6:39 pm

these are great. I remember when i was little my aunt use to make quilts and they were nice just not as nice as the ones in your pics. Thanks for sharing.

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Michelle April 7, 2014 at 6:59 pm

That is SO wonderful that you and your husband made a quilt when you were first married. These quilts are all awesome! I taught pregnant women in the adult prison system for several years. Their favorite project was making a quilt for their babies. It was a lot of work for me. I had to do ALL the cutting. I was lucky to get needles approved for hand sewing. It was great therapy for the women.

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Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 3:57 am

Oooh. Yes. There are a lot of potentially dangerous articles in quilting supplies.

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Patti April 7, 2014 at 7:21 pm

I’ve made exactly 1 quilt in my life – years (and years) ago. Abi and I made a polka-dot quilt for a lifelong friend of mine as a wedding gift. This was more than 30 years ago. Fast forward to 2011 (and my friend’s long-time 2nd marriage) and Abi and I flew to Baja to visit said friend. We entered the guest room and I saw a quilt sitting on the bed. I looked at my friend and asked, “Why does that quilt look familiar to me?” Once she reminded us that we made the quilt, Abi and I were impressed it had held up so well, we did good! – My favorite photo is the patchwork quilt constructed of pieced squares.

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Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 3:59 am

It sounds as though you and Abi and Steve and I have the “one off quilt” thing in common. 😉

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Arleen April 7, 2014 at 7:27 pm

The quilts are beautiful. Years ago I did quilting but like many hand crafts, were given up for the computer. I made a quilt for a someone who was president of a dog club. She had long hair dachshunds and we all gathered swatches of long hair dachshunds, bones, etc and made a beautiful quilt. When something is hand made it is forever

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 7:49 pm

I am always touched when someone takes the time to make something by hand for me. Because I’ve done some quilting, I know how time and labor intensive it it.

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William Butler April 7, 2014 at 9:56 pm

Hi Suzanne,
Glad you made it through last week.

I know nothing of quilts, but I do appreciate the beauty of the patterns, especially the Margaret Teruya quilt.

Is there a standard size for quilts or are they all different? How much time does it take, on average, to create one?

Kind Regards,
BIll

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 8:13 pm

Thanks for stopping by, Bill. Quilts come in all sizes from baby quilts up to quilts for king size beds. Some are also made to be wall hangings. The “art” quilts were smaller. The amount of time it takes to make one depends on the skill of the quilter and the techniques being used. Nowadays, many fine quilters do machine quilting. When quilts were hand sewn, women would often gather for a quilting “bee” where they would sit around a frame and work on one quilt.

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Doreen Pendgracs April 7, 2014 at 10:24 pm

Gorgeous quilts! I’m amazed at how quilting has taken over the world, even in hot climates! A friend of mine attended one in Dubai! You sure wouldn’t think they’d need quilts there.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 8:14 pm

These types of quilts are actually quite thin. They are not the commercial or down quilts we use for warmth.

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Tuhin April 8, 2014 at 1:20 am

Nice quilts..really nice! The last patchwork design is the best(according to me)! 🙂

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Sandy April 8, 2014 at 6:27 am

I have sewn a quilt once, it was an old quilt that was sewn by my grandmother and given to my mother. I loved when my mom passed it onto me, however the quilt had seen better days. (It was actually used on my mom’s bed as a bedspread for many years) I really had no idea what I was doing, I cut patches of my favourite fabric then started sewing until it was large enough to cover it. It looks nothing like it was, but I know what is inside and that is all that matters. I curl up with it on cold nights.

The pictures those quilts are spectacular! Such detail, I admire people who are so artistic.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 8:56 pm

Sandy, I admire you for jumping in to preserve a quilt that was meaningful to you. You should embroider a little note on it, so people will know its history.

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Lenie April 8, 2014 at 8:03 am

Hi Suzanne – thanks for sharing the photographs – the quilts are gorgeous. I don’t have the patience to quilt but since I live in Amish country have ample opportunity to admire many. Hope you’ll share a photo of your quilt once its finished.
Lenie

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 9:04 pm

Yes, Amish quilts are an art form unto themselves. They reflect the waste not, want not philosophy of the Amish.

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Suzanne Stavert April 8, 2014 at 12:33 pm

I helped my grandma when I was young (very young) I have always had a special fondness for quilting and I especially appreciate Hawaiian quilts. In my opinion they are in a different league. I thoroughly enjoyed your post. Careful with your stash… 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 9:05 pm

Making a quilt can often be a joint or community effort. It’s nice that you have the memory of helping your grandma with a quilt.

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Doreen McGettigan April 8, 2014 at 1:17 pm

These are lovely.
I have never created a quilt but I am guily of having a stash of fabric for, someday. In the meantime I have friends who quilt and have blessed me with beautiful quilts.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 9:13 pm

For many people, quilting is all about the fabric—-hence, our stashes 😉

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Debra Yearwood April 8, 2014 at 1:22 pm

These quilts are spectacular pieces of art. I am not a quilter myself but have always admired the artistry and workmanship involved in quilting. I actually bought myself a quilt to hang last year and put it in our guest bedroom. Whenever I go in there, I just stair at it and my guests know they are loved. 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 9:14 pm

Debra, I usually hang hand-made quilts as well to honor the time and effort that they take. I agree that a lot of people recognize this and appreciate that you dedicated such a nice piece of “art” to their space.

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Carole Terwilliger Meyers April 8, 2014 at 2:21 pm

I have quilted in the past and have always enjoyed seeing Hawaiian quilts. Thanks for posting the lovely images.

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Alice April 8, 2014 at 7:52 pm

These are beautiful! I love the way some the quilts are so clearly Hawaiian. Thanks for this great post.

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Welli April 9, 2014 at 4:18 am

That close up short is brilliant. My granny was big on quilts an so I grew up sleeping in them. Brings back old memories.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 9:20 pm

It’s interesting how many of us have fond memories from our youth associated with quilts.

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Josie April 9, 2014 at 10:21 am

I think you can learn a lot about a culture through its quilts. These are a nice example.
Always enjoy your funny posts, Suzanne!
Josie

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Linda April 9, 2014 at 4:41 pm

They are gorgeous. I always admire folk who have the patience and stamina to do something like this. I was talking the other day with a lady who does traditional embroidery, and she was telling me how her neck aches at the end of the day – not to mention strain on her eyes. I guess quilting will be the same. Do you have any idea how quilting arrived in Hawaii? Presumably it’s not an ancient Hawaiin craft?

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 9, 2014 at 9:46 pm

Quilts and quilting were introduced to Hawaii by missionaries in the early 1800’s. However, the local Hawaiians, adapted the art to reflect their own traditions, so that Hawaiian quilts are recognizable style today.

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roz warren April 9, 2014 at 8:24 pm

I’ve never made a quilt and probably never will. But I enjoy reading about them.

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andleeb April 12, 2014 at 7:21 am

These patterns are really beautiful. This work is also done in rural areas of Pakistan where females collect fabric and when they are free cut squares of fabric and join them together to form triangular shapes and all the patterns are really fantastic , one can not believe that each and every piece is joined by needles.
I did not know that this thing is also done in other parts of the world. It is nice to have an exhibition to introduce new talent. By the way I was amazed that you have made also with your husband during first year of marriage normally newly married couples emphasize on travelling and having fun.
Thanks for sharing nice photographs and about exhibition.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 12, 2014 at 5:34 pm

Actually, many cultures have forms of needle craft that use the same techniques used in American quilts. Yes, my husband and I did spend a lot of time on our patchwork quilt during the first year of our marriage. We were both working really hard at our jobs and I think we were too tired to do anything much more energetic. That’s why they started calling us “Mr. and Mrs. Excitement”. However, fast forward 32 years—-and we’re empty nesters, I’m semi-retired from being a lawyer and we’re traveling and having what we consider “fun”.

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Sherryl @ SimplySherryl April 12, 2014 at 6:51 pm

I would have to be the one to admit the secret stash in my sewing room! Way too much material has been gathered over the years.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 13, 2014 at 4:58 pm

I was really surprised to find out how addictive fabric can be. Now, my stash is my little secret—-or it was—until now. 😉

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Catherine April 13, 2014 at 8:39 am

Love the pineapple quilt, so cute 🙂 Have never done any quilting myself to be honest, do not have the patience!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 13, 2014 at 4:59 pm

It does take some patience and some precision. Unfortunately, I usually have to spend a fair amount of time undoing my mistakes.

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Joy Weese Moll April 13, 2014 at 8:53 am

These are gorgeous. I love the blue swirly one and the one with the pineapples.

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Carol Cassara April 13, 2014 at 3:44 pm

Beautiful and evocative of the islands. A good reminder that getting back to Hawaii should be on my list!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 13, 2014 at 5:00 pm

I’m glad we have had the chance to live here in Honolulu for 3 months, so we could get to know the place a little better than on a 4 day visit.

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MaryAnn Bufalin, president, Hawaii Quilt Guild April 14, 2014 at 5:27 am

What a beautiful article about our guild’s annual show. Yes, quilting is enormously popular here as in may places. Our quilt has upwards of 200+ members and there are guild on other islands. There are many books on traditional Hawaiian quilting, always done by hand, thousands of hours of patience and love going into those treasures. THe contemporary ones you saw in the show are among the most beautiful examples of fabric art available! Our local members are extremely talented artists and show not only locally, but nationally and internationally. We welcome visitor to our show each year, our gift to the community, at no charge. Our updated website, hawaiiquiltguild.com will keep you posted about the time and dates each year, as well as meetings. Visitor are ALWAYS welcomed to join our meetings, we are the most warm, friendly group of quilters anywhere! Aloha and Mahalo (thank you) for your delightful message!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 14, 2014 at 5:06 pm

MaryAnn, congratulations for setting up such a great show. Judging by the people visiting when I was there, it was very well attended and received by the community. Yes, please let me know when the show is scheduled for next year and I will share that information with Boomeresque readers and on social media.

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Donna Hull April 14, 2014 at 11:41 am

I have a friend who loves to quilt and visits Hawaii often. I’ll have to tell her about this exhibit. And thanks for sharing how you and the Dr. got the name of Dr. and Mrs. Excitement. Cute.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr April 14, 2014 at 5:08 pm

Thanks, Donna. I hope to be able to post the information about the dates for next year’s Hawaii Quilt Guild show so you can let your friends know. I have been to other quilt shows and this one really was excellent. It was a special treat to come upon it here in Honolulu.

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Jennifer April 17, 2014 at 7:35 am

Beautiful work! I love these quilts. I have quilted in the past and tend to move more abstract. I’m terrible at perfect corners. We have a quilt museum in Golden, Colorado that I’ve never visited. I’m going to add it to my list of places to see based on your post. Thanks for the great reminder of how amazing quilts can be.

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MaryAnn Bufalini HQG April 17, 2014 at 5:01 pm

Thank you, I’ll pass that along to our talented members. Now, we all travel a lot, and usually know almost everywhere to go to buy fabrics and see quilts on the mainland; but I haven’t heard of something in Colorado. Please tell me and I’ll share it. Happy Quilting!

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My Inner Chick April 18, 2014 at 12:26 pm

Gorgeous.
I love how quilts can tell a story!
Priceless. x

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Maddy Fluhr April 21, 2014 at 3:46 pm

I have 9 sampler quilt squares that I painstakingly hand stitched in a class in Albany, CA years and years ago, squirreled away somewhere. I am determined to a. find it and b. finish it (in this lifetime!) I believe a friend who lives in Portland, Oregon will help me finish it, if I can find it and get to Portland!! (I hope to take a road trip there with the fam this summer) My color sense has completely changed since then, but it would still be immensely satisfying to see it hanging on a wall in our home someday!!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 5, 2014 at 10:51 pm

I have my unfinished quilt also. It must be a family issue. I am also determined to finish mine.

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Susan May 5, 2014 at 8:41 pm

Oh, wow. How gorgeous! Back in the dark ages I did some quilting, but I never got as good as these stitchers!

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MaryAnn Bufalini, President Hawaii Quilt Guild May 6, 2014 at 8:13 pm

It’s great to see all the comments here!!!!! Thank you! Since we in the HQG are all passionate about quilting, I hope we turned on some of you – inspired you to get those unfinished pieces done…get together with friends, it’s so motivating! And/or come on out to Hawaii, meet some new friends, quilt together!

We would love to invite you all to our 2015 show. It will be held at the Honolulu Museum of Art School Friday May 8, 2015 to Sunday May 17, 2015. Aloha!

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 6, 2014 at 8:47 pm

Thanks for the information about next year’s dates, MaryAnn. I’ll annotate the article to include them. I wish I could be here for that.

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Carol Kamaile May 10, 2014 at 12:49 am

Aloha, glad you enjoyed HQG 2014 Quilt Show. Hawaiian quilting has been around since the 1800’s and was a very protected cultural art. Some of our quilts sell from $10,000 up to $42,000. Lots of zeros there! I have students young and old and we all help each other open the design, and pin it down. After the applique is complete, we all help again to baste the three layers together. The normal person would allow at least a year to finish a bed quilt, but others that quilt all day can complete one in about 6 months. Yep, it’s all hand appliqued and hand quilted. Heard about your site from MaryAnn Bufalini current prez of Hawaii Quilt Guild, mahalo, carol (past prez)

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr May 10, 2014 at 12:59 am

Thanks for your comment, Carol. I have just enough quilting experience to understand the huge amount of work that goes into a hand stitched traditional Hawaiian quilt. I am in awe.

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