Boomeresque:Definition
1. Adj.: Describing a person born between 1 Jan. 1946 and 31 Dec. 1964
2. Adj.: Description of a person, place or thing possessing Baby Boomer je ne sais quoi
3. See also, Boomer, Esq.: A Baby Boomer who is also a licensed attorney (See, e.g., About).

#59 Travel Photo Roulette — REVOLUTION

by Suzanne Fluhr on June 27, 2013 · 92 comments

REVOLUTION - Copy

July 8, 2013  AND WE HAVE A WINNER!  SCROLL DOWN TO SEE ALL 27 ENTRIES IN ROUND #59 OF PHOTO TRAVEL ROULETTE AND THEN CLICK HERE TO SEE THE WINNER AND RUNNERS UP  ****************************************************************************

While I am grateful to have been chosen by the Gypsy Nesters to host the 59th round of Travel Photo Roulette, I’m  a little chagrined that instead of having been chosen because I submitted an artfully photographed beautiful beach, or the sun setting behind a majestic mountain, they picked my submission as the cheesiest submitted in their theme of “Cheesy Tourist Diversions“.

Travel Photo Roulette was started by Jeremy at Living the Dream as a way for travel bloggers to showcase their best photography.

For each round a new theme is chosen, and independent travel bloggers are asked to submit their photos. Then a winner is chosen to host (and judge) the following round on their website.

We’re coming up on the Fourth of July, the big celebration in the United States of the day we declared our independence from Great Britain, thus officially commencing the American Revolution. So, the theme for Travel Photo Roulette #59 is:

Revolution

Several people have asked me what type of “revolution” I mean. The answer is  —  there is no answer. It means whatever you want it to mean. If I were submitting instead of hosting, I would probably decide between one of these two photos and I would submit them with these descriptions:

Street demonstration in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Political Demonstration in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Revolving carousel at the harbor in Honfleur, France

honfleur pic

How Travel Roulette Works

The rules are simple. The hosting blogger is the chosen winner of the previous round. The new host chooses a theme for the next round and bloggers can submit a single entry based on how they interpret the theme. The time frame for submissions is one week. At the end of the week, the host blogger chooses the winner for that round and said winner repeats the process on their own blog. Readers can always try and sway the host via comments during the contest (and I hope you will), but the host is free to give as little or as much weight to people’s opinions as they wish.

The Rules for Travel Photo Roulette

1) One submission per blog (so sites that have 2+ authors only get one entry).
2) Post processing is fine for this round. Cropping and correction for red-eye or camera flaws are ok. Minor edits are totally fine if you think it improves your image.
3) Abstract submissions welcomed as long as it fits within the interpretation of the chosen phrase. Remember, the hosting blogger chooses the winner, so if they cannot understand the submission, you might not win!
4) Keep phrases general so that all bloggers can participate. Specific items like “Eiffel Tower” should be avoided but rather made open-ended like “monuments.” For variety, it is okay to say focused things such as “monuments at night” in which most of us have pictures of.
6) Abstract thoughts are appreciated, but keep it within the realm that all readers will understand. No “Kafka-esque”, but “Overlooking Creation” is able to be interpreted by all.
7) No obscene pictures or phrases allowed. Suggestive phrases and photography can be accepted, but please keep it within reason.
8) After a sufficient period of time, phrases can be reused, however new photos must be submitted. Keep the ideas and photos fresh!
9) Pictures from your entire portfolio are fair to submit. You do not have to take the photo within the week of the contest period to submit it.
10) Most importantly, ALL PHOTOS MUST BE YOUR OWN.
11) And last but not the least, talk about Photo Roulette! When tweeting about it or mentioning it on Facebook, don’t forget to use the #PhotoRoulette hashtag.

How to Submit

Entering is easy. Just leave a comment below with a link to the URL of the image you’d like to submit and a description of the image to help flesh it out rather than a caption on the photo. (I’ve added a comment as an example). Once you’ve added your comment, we’ll add the image to the submissions. Don’t forget to check back during the week to see the other submissions and join the conversation by leaving comments for others. We’d love to hear what you think.

The contest runs for a week, starting Thursday, June 27th and ending at 11:59 P.M. EDST on Thursday, July 4th. The winner will be announced within a few days of the end of the contest and the selected blogger will then host round #60.

Please do your best to keep your images to a medium size and be aware that anything larger than 550px wide will be reduced in size to fit my layout.

Past Photo Roulette Winners and Hosts

The following is a list of the previously played rounds of the game and the hosting blogger for each. This list also doubles as a winners’ table as each topic host won the preceding round. Click the host’s link to go directly to that entry to see some stunning photographs from the chosen term/phrase.

1. Nov 4–10, 2010 – Living the Dream – “Animals”
2. Nov 17–24, 2010 – Skinny Backpacker – “Road Signs”
3. Nov 29–Dec 6, 2010 – Dream a Little Dream – “Street Art”
4. Dec 8–15, 2010 – Flashpacker HQ – “Festival”
5. Dec 17–24, 2010 – Over Yonderlust – “Landmarks”
6. Dec 26–Jan 2, 2011 – Don’t Ever Look Back – “Beaches”
7. Jan 5–12, 2011 – ThePlanetD – “Portraits”
8. Jan 15–22, 2011 – Travel with a Mate – “Motion”
9. Jan 26–Feb 3, 2011 – Johnny Vagabond – “Water”
10. Feb 8–15, 2011 – Ken Kaminesky – “Urban”
11. Feb 21–27, 2011 – Travels of Adam – “Friday Night”
12. Mar 7–13, 2011 – Itchy Feet Chronicles – “The Journey”
13. Mar 19– 25, 2011 – Brendan’s Adventures – “Changing Seasons”
14. Apr 4–10, 2011 – Shutterfeet – “Storytelling”
15. Apr 13–21, 2011 – 10 Times One – “Piousness”
16. Apr 26–May 4, 2011 – Beached Eskimo – “Learning”
17. May 21–27, 2011 – Travel Junkies – “Architecture”
18. Jun 1–7, 2011 – Destination World – “Transportation”
19. Jun 8–15, 2011 – Living the Dream – “Paradise”
20. Jun 21-28, 2011 – Vagabond Quest – “Clothes”
21. Jul 4-11, 2011 – The Unframed World – “Symmetry”
22. Jul 16-25, 2011 – Beached Eskimo – “Home”
23. Jul 31 – Aug 7, 2011 – BackPackerBanter – “Inspiration”
24. Aug 14 – 21, 2011 – WanderingTrader – “Darkness”
25. Aug 28 – Sep 4, 2011 – Finding the Universe – “Tranquillity”
26. Sep 12 – 19, 2011 – Fearful Adventurer – “Food”
27. Sep 23 – 30, 2011 – Adventures of a GoodMan – “City”
28. Oct 06 – 13, 2011 – Globe-Trekking.com – “Reflections”
29. Oct 17 – 24, 2011 – Scene With A Hart – ”Framing”
30. Nov 9 – 16, 2011 – Vagabond Quest – “Silhouettes”
31. Nov 26 – Dec 3, 2011 – Hecktic Travels – “Music”
32. Dec 11 – Dec 18, 2011 – Globetrotter Girls – “Love”
33. Dec 25 – Jan 1st, 2012– Man on the lam – “Humor”
34. January 8 – Jan 15 – My Walkabout – “Winter”
35. Jan 15 – Jan 22 – The Art of Slow Travel – “Blue”
36. Feb 6 – Feb 13 – Ten Times One – “Depth of Field”
37. Feb 22 – Feb 29 – Runaway Juno – “My Glorious Digital Nomad Moment”
38. March 7 – March 14 – Nomadbiba – “Sunshine”
39. March 24 – 31 – Travel With Kat – “Local Character”
40. April 10th – 16th – The Travel Bunny – “Street Scene”
41. April 23rd – April 30th – Adventure Crow – “Spirit of the Country”
42. May 7th – 14th – Food Travel Bliss – “Evening”
43. May 17th – May 24th – Matt Gibson – “Adventure”
44. May 30th – June 6th – Flashpacker HQ – “Once In A Lifetime”
45. July 23rd – July 30th – Skinny Backpacker – “Surreal”
46. August 10th – August 17th – 2away – “Smile”
47. Aug 27 – Sept 2 – Bridges and Balloons – “Excellent Splendour of the Universe”
48. Sept 8 – Sept 15, 2012 – The GypsyNester – “What the ?!”
49. Oct 22 – 29, 2012 – Runaway Juno – “Sweet”
50. Nov 12 – 19, 2012 – GQ Trippin – “Play”
51. Dec 15-22, 2012 – Breakaway Backpacker – “Face”
52. Jan 14-21, 2013 – Fly, Icarus, Fly – “Serendipity
53. Feb 1-8, 2013 – Travel Transmissions – “Lost in Thought”
54. Feb 15-22, 2013 – Wanderlusters – “The Natural World”
55. Mar 17-24, 2013 – Travel Junkies – “Patterns”
56. April 25-May 3rd, 2013 – Living the Dream – “Your First Time”
57. May12-19th, 2013 – Getting Stamped –  “As The Sun Goes Down”
58. June 6-13th, 2013 – The GypsyNester – “Cheesy Tourist Diversions”
59. June 27-July 4, 2013 – Boomeresque – “Revolution”

Don’t forget to talk about #PhotoRoulette! Here’s a sample tweet:

I entered my best “Revolution” photo to this week’s Travel #PhotoRoulette! Check it out! http://www.boomeresque.com/?p=3460

Keep up to date with this week’s Photo Roulette by following Boomeresque here and on Facebook – Twitter – Google+ 

ENTRIES

#1  Submitted by Noel of Travel Photo Discovery:

Did you know during the secession crisis, secessionists in San Francisco and Oregon tried unsuccessfully to separate from the union? There were pro and anti-secession groups throughout the state joining the North and South during the revolution. Gold was shipped east to support the war cause.

_MG_6122-Edit

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#2  Submitted by Leora of LeoraW.com:

A parrot on the (revolving) Philadelphia Zoo carousel: I imagine this parrot is saying “Awk! I am a handsome dude, aren’t I? Awk!”

parrot_reflection leora

 

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#3.  Submitted by Christy of Flip Flops Abroad:

A military coup ousted the government in Argentina in the late 1970′s and as the military grappled to hold their power, they began a horrendous practice of taking people. Actors, Teachers, Authors, Revolutionists, and other members of Argentine society just disappeared by the thousands for voicing opinions contrary to the military government. Some were dropped alive out of airplanes, others thrown overboard in the sea, and still others remain missing to this day. Each year, there is a protest for the 30,000 people that disappeared in the hopes that they’re families will one day learn the truth.

buenos-aires-disappeared-protest-plaza-de-mayo-banners-800

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#4.  Submitted by Caro of Passport and a Toothbrush :

A softer side within a revolution. Two friends seen hugging for what seemed like hours while police came in to evict protesters during the Occupy movement, in Toronto. With so much chaos around them, they didn’t seem to have a care in the world.

Caro Leal Tornot Hug

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#5.  Submitted by Erik of Around this World:

Despite the end of the decade-long Maoist insurgency (The People’s War), the beautiful country of Nepal remains politically unstable. Frequent nationwide strikes (bandh) by the Communist Party of Nepal (CPN Maoist) bring the entire country to a standstill. During this strike on February 19, 2013, I found myself in the capital of Kathmandu, where all businesses were shuttered and the normally traffic-clogged streets were completely empty. It was a strange and eerie sight to see people wandering around the streets free of cars and motorbikes. Here, I took a picture of some kids playing cricket in the middle of what is normally a major thoroughfare.

kathmandu_strike_photoroulette erik

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#6.  Submitted by Jaime of Breakaway Backpacker:

This photo was taken during the one year anniversary of the Egyptian Revolution. It was a Friday and everyone was performing the prayer in Tahrir Sq. I was able to capture this one man standing in the middle of everyone praying. To this day I still wonder so many thing and have a million questions, but just don’t know. I believe he is a Christian protecting Muslims in case cops or protesters come, but don’t know. It’s a powerful image.

Jaime Tahrir Sq

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#7.  Submitted by Billie of Santa Fe Travelers:

This shot was taken in Santa Fe last Valentine’s Day at a rally at The Roundhouse (our state capitol building). Local women and their supporters were joining with women around the world (as part of One Billion Rising) to dance and proclaim “No more,” regarding sexual and other abuse. Local Axle Contemporary, an avant-garde gallery on wheels created the “Vagina Van” as their statement. Viewing the bemused expressions on the police motorcycle escort was priceless.

 Vagina van

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#8.  Submitted by Veronica of the Gypsy Nesters:

This is one of my favorite monuments because it is so unusual. It is a memorial to Jan Palach and Jan Zajíc, martyrs of the Velvet Revolution, on the ground in Wenceslas Square in Prague.

prague-monument-velvet-revolution

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#9.  Submitted by Shane of TravelPhotoFacts:

During the 2002 financial crisis Argentines were denied full access to their bank accounts. As you can imagine banks, such as this one in Buenos Aires, became a target for protesters:

Shane BA bank

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#10.  Submitted by Josie of House Sitting Travel:

“The Thousand Wheels Revolution” is my title for this photo of the Tour of Denmark, (Danmark Rundt), bicycle race. The racers are professionals in the UCI Continental Circuits, and is similar but not as publicized as the Tour de France.
The race whooshed by in front of a home where Conrad and I were house sitting just outside Copenhagen in 2010. It was an amazing experience to watch the racers, mostly in thick packs, but these two were out in front by themselves. The fellow in black went on to win. It rained throughout the entire race and I got this shot as Conrad held a big umbrella over my head. I fully admit to never using a term like, “the bicycle wheels revolved around and around,” but I took the poetic license just so I could enter this photo.

Bike revolutions Josie

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#11.  Submitted by Adam of HappinessPlunge:

This is the first image I captured on my first day in Caracas, Venezuela. It says “I am with the revolution” and the streaks are the colors on the Venezuelan flag.

Venezuela Rev

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 #12.  Submitted by Suzanne of the Travel Bunny:

The first meal I ever had in Canada was in Toronto in the revolving restaurant at the top of the CN Tower.

CN Tower, Toronto

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#13.  Submitted by Linda of Journey Jottings:

Revolutions make me think of superpowers and what could be more super-powerful than a super-moon (which we recently experienced) and, which is definitely more my kind of revolutionary model.

Blue Moon

Blue Moon

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#14.  Submitted by Irene of More Time to Travel:

A peaceful revolution in Avignon, France.

Avignon, France

Avignon, France

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#15. Submitted by Charli of Wanderlusters:

The scars of the Nicaraguan Revolution are still visible on the streets of Granada however during our visit we captured a shot which juxtaposed any concept of violence and revolt. A little girl day dreaming by the fountain in the Parque Colon – Aquí no se rinde nadie ‘Here no one surrenders’.

Granada, Nicaragua

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#16.  Vanessa of Turnip Seed Travel submitted:

Masks and puppets from the Bread and Puppet Theater of New York City, circa 1963. Now housed in a barn-turned-museum in Northern Vermont, these dramatic puppets revolutionized theater as they spoke to revolution, protest, and politics and were a key part of the anti-Vietnam War movement.

2814039

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#16.  Submitted by Bethaney of Flashpacker Family:

A graffiti art statement on the hypocrisy of war, found in Hoi An, Vietnam, a country that knows revolution all too well.

Viet Nam graffiti

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#17.  Submitted by Sam of Food Travel Bliss:

We were in Prague a few days after the passing Václav Havel in 2011 and the country was in a state of great mourning. The beloved Havel had candlelight vigils erected in his honour all over the city to commemorate his achievements as the leader of the velvet revolution and one of the founders of the pro-democracy movement in Eastern Europe. There were large, official posters and banners all over the city but in one side street we saw this piece of graffiti completely surrounded on the ground by red candles and it caught our full attention. I thought this picture really captured this rounds theme of revolution – how just one man could start a revolution that would ultimately lead to the fall of the Berlin wall – one of the biggest revolutions in recent European history.

Vaclav-Havel

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#18:  Submitted by Andrew of Ark3

Seeing this all over Europe these days – mostly peaceful, but sometimes not…

Madrid, Spain austerity demonstration

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#19. Submitted by Kris of The World is Our District:

I’m going with a photo that isn’t my best “revolution” photo, but I think it’s uber-timely because the Fourth marks victory in the first American revolution and the turning point of the second with victory in Vicksburg and Gettysburg. I shot this photo while on assignment at Gettysburg a couple of days ago. It’s the point where the Confederacy was literally turned back for good. Some people call it the high water mark of the South…others remember it as Pickett’s charge, but it was the moment that the war for America’s second revolution was turned for the Union in my native Pennsylvania.

Gettysburg_13

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#20.  Submitted by Kristin of Be My Travel Muse:

The call for a revolution: these beautiful guys. Found only in Borneo and Sumatra, Orangutans are threatened by growing palm oil plantations, most of which are not even owned by the locals in these areas. What’s worse, the burnings lately have created a smokey existence. A revolution is needed to keep them around.

DSC_2085.jpg

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#21.  Submitted by Dani of Globe Trotter Girls:

We came across this Karl Marx street art in Lisbon. Portugal. With the word Revolução, it seems that socialist/communist belief system is making a comeback in some circles in Portugal, a country hard hit by the financial crisis – a purely capitalist creation.

lisbon graffiti revolucao

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#22.  Submitted by Jessica of What’s Hot UK:

Naked Revolution: The Naked Bike ride takes place in London and in cities around the world each year in order to protest Oil Dependency. Speeding nude down city streets is certainly one way to grab some serious attention for the cause!

Naked Bike Ride, London, England

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#23.  Submitted by Dale of Anglo-Italian Follow Us:

I guess I should count myself lucky that I’ve never needed to be part of a social revolution within my home country or whilst in any countries I’ve visited. The only memory recall I have when I think of ‘revolution’ is from some photos Franca and I took whilst in Kobe, Japan where at night the whole bay is up in lights. The one picture that sprang to mind first was of the ferris wheel with it’s lights flashing in sequence and timed just right it looked just like a revolving swirling line of light.

Kobe, Japan, Ferris Wheel

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#24.  Submitted by Carole of Travels with Carole:

In 2010 hundreds of thousands red-shirt protesters gathered in Bangkok to demand that the current prime minister resign and that the former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, at that time a fugitive, be permitteded to return.  I saw this t-shirt stand through a bus window.

red shirt pic

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#25.  Submitted by Tom of Travel Past 50:

Spent our Independence Day taking a tour of the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland. The sectarian violence only ended here a very few years ago, and the British only got around to admitting they were wrong for killing 13 unarmed civilians on Bloody Sunday 1972 in 2010. But things are getting better here, despite the frequent reminders like this one of days when the people here rose up against the British like we did in 1776.

mural, bogside, derry, northern ireland

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#26.  Mary of Bermtopia submitted:

LAS VEGAS: Round and round you go, where you’ll stop, you never know.

9201490842_bc97477f11

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#27.  Submitted by Marcia of Inside Journeys:

The London Eye.

The London Eye

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{ 66 comments… read them below or add one }

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 27, 2013 at 6:13 pm

This is an example. My relatives (including me and my offspring travel blogger) are barred from submitting. (Actually, my son can submit, but he can’t win. Sorry Jeremy 😉 Anyway, he is pretending he doesn’t know me.

On our first walk around Buenos Aires, we came upon this demonstration. Given the country’s history, we weren’t sure if it might be the start of a revolution. The next day, we came upon another demonstration.
http://www.boomeresque.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Demonstration-cropped.jpg or

At dusk in Honfleur on the Normandy coast in France, we came upon a still harbor with a glassy surface, perfect for reflecting the carousel as it revolved to the sound of children’s laughter.
http://www.boomeresque.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/honfleur-pic-hd-e1372364881794.jpg

Reply

avatar noel June 27, 2013 at 6:39 pm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/12701042@N04/9102081449/
Did you know during the secession crisis, secessionists in San Francisco and Oregon tried unsuccessfully to separate from the union? There were pro and anti-secession groups throughout the state joining the North and South during the revolution. Gold was shipped east to support the war cause.

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 27, 2013 at 6:49 pm

Ding Ding Ding. The first submission prize (well, actually, there’s no prize, just the satisfaction of being first) goes to Noel Morata. Noel, I will add your photo to the blog post this evening.

Reply

avatar Leora June 27, 2013 at 7:00 pm

http://www.leoraw.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/parrot_reflection.jpg

A parrot on the (revolving) Philadelphia Zoo carousel: I imagine this parrot is saying “Awk! I am a handsome dude, aren’t I? Awk!”

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 27, 2013 at 7:44 pm

Thanks, Leora. That parrot looks kind of dizzy. I hope s/he doesn’t fall off 😉

Reply

avatar Christy Clifton June 27, 2013 at 9:18 pm

A military coup ousted the government in Argentina in the late 1970’s and as the military grappled to hold their power, they began a horrendous practice of taking people. Actors, Teachers, Authors, Revolutionists, and other members of Argentine society just disappeared by the thousands for voicing opinions contrary to the military government. Some were dropped alive out of airplanes, others thrown overboard in the sea, and still others remain missing to this day. Each year, there is a protest for the 30,000 people that disappeared in the hopes that they’re families will one day learn the truth.
http://flipflopsabroad.com/images/travel_photos/argentina/buenos-aires/buenos-aires-disappeared-protest-plaza-de-mayo-banners-800.jpg

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 27, 2013 at 11:33 pm

This is a really evocative photo. The ghastly side of revolution.

Reply

avatar Caro June 28, 2013 at 10:44 am

A softer side within a revolution. Two friends seen hugging for what seemed like hours while police came in to evict protesters during the Occupy movement, in Toronto. With so much chaos around them, they didn’t seem to have a care in the world.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lealcaro/6394634999/

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 28, 2013 at 9:32 pm

When there is sanity amidst madness, the juxtaposition seems stark.

Reply

avatar Erik June 28, 2013 at 10:56 am

http://www.aroundthisworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/kathmandu_strike_photoroulette.jpg

Despite the end of the decade-long Maoist insurgency (The People’s War), the beautiful country of Nepal remains politically unstable. Frequent nationwide strikes (bandh) by the Communist Party of Nepal (CPN Maoist) bring the entire country to a standstill. During this strike on February 19, 2013, I found myself in the capital of Kathmandu, where all businesses were shuttered and the normally traffic-clogged streets were completely empty. It was a strange and eerie sight to see people wandering around the streets free of cars and motorbikes. Here, I took a picture of some kids playing cricket in the middle of what is normally a major thoroughfare.

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 28, 2013 at 9:38 pm

Your photo demonstrates that somehow, it is the most vulnerable, the children, who are the last to surrender to chaos and evil. This photo made me remember what Anne Frank wrote in her diary while the world descended into madness and darkness around her:
“In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can’t build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery, and death. I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness, I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too, I can feel the sufferings of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again.”

Reply

avatar Jaime June 28, 2013 at 12:54 pm

Oh wow what a good category!!! I love it.

I am submitting my favorite photo from my entire 2 years on the road. I spent 7 months in Egypt and lived in Cairo for 5 of them. I happen to be there during some of the most historical moments. I was there for the one year & two year anniversary of the revolution also when they voted for president and then when he was announced president. Anyway I have written tons about it on my blog.

This photo was taken during the one year anniversary of the Egyptian Revolution. It was a Friday and everyone was performing the prayer in Tahrir Sq. I was able to capture this one man standing in the middle of everyone praying. To this day I still wonder so many thing and have a million questions, but just don’t know. I believe he is a Christian protecting Muslims in case cops or protesters come, but don’t know. It’s a powerful image.
http://breakawaybackpacker.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/DSC03639.jpg

Reply

avatar Erik June 28, 2013 at 2:06 pm

Awesome photo, Jaime! I heard the Muslims also protected the Copts/Christians during the revolution?

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 28, 2013 at 3:49 pm

Jaime, thanks for sharing this powerful photo. Oddly enough, it captures the notion of tolerance after the revolution. No arrest for being blasphemous by NOT praying with the others.

Reply

avatar Katie June 30, 2013 at 11:01 pm

This picture is so fantastic. I have nothing else to say about it, but wow!

Reply

avatar santafetraveler June 28, 2013 at 7:46 pm

Thanks for offering to upload my photo, Suzanne. As it isn’t up on our blog Santa Fe Travelers (http://www.santafetravelers.com) I hadn’t a clue how to do it.

This shot was taken in Santa Fe last Valentine’s Day at a rally at The Roundhouse (our state capitol building). Local women and their supporters were joining with women around the world (as part of One Billion Rising) to dance and proclaim “No more,” regarding sexual and other abuse. Local Axle Contemporary, an avant-garde gallery on wheels created the “Vagina Van” as their statement. Viewing the bemused expressions on the police motorcycle escort was priceless.

Reply

avatar The GypsyNesters June 28, 2013 at 9:29 pm

This is one of my favorite monuments because it is so unusual. It is a memorial to Jan Palach and Jan Zajíc, martyrs of the Velvet Revolution, on the ground in Wenceslas Square in Prague. -Veronica

http://www.gypsynester.com/velvet-revolution.htm

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 29, 2013 at 3:22 pm

A reminder that even in “Velvet Revolutions” freedom isn’t free.

Reply

avatar Shane June 29, 2013 at 6:59 am

During the 2002 financial crisis Argentines were denied full access to their bank accounts. As you can imagine banks, such as this one in Buenos Aires, became a target for protesters:

http://www.travelphotofacts.com/wp-content/uploads/TR59Revolution.jpg

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 29, 2013 at 3:26 pm

I guess banks are pretty universally viewed as “The Man”.

Reply

avatar Josie June 29, 2013 at 8:53 am

Hi Suzanne,

“The Thousand Wheels Revolution” is my title for this photo of the Tour of Denmark, (Danmark Rundt), bicycle race. The racers are professionals in the UCI Continental Circuits, and is similar but not as publicized as the Tour de France.
The race whooshed by in front of a home where Conrad and I were house sitting just outside Copenhagen in 2010. It was an amazing experience to watch the racers, mostly in thick packs, but these two were out in front by themselves. The fellow in black went on to win. It rained throughout the entire race and I got this shot as Conrad held a big umbrella over my head. I fully admit to never using a term like, “the bicycle wheels revolved around and around,” but I took the poetic license just so I could enter this photo.

Thanks!
Josie

http://www.housesittingtravel.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Europe-2010-478.jpg

Reply

Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 29, 2013 at 3:27 pm

Thanks for participating, Josie. The wheels on the bike do indeed go “round and round”!

Reply

avatar Adam Pervez | HappinessPlunge.com June 29, 2013 at 4:41 pm

This is the first image I captured on my first day in Caracas, Venezuela. It says “I am with the revolution” and the streaks are the colors on the Venezuelan flag.

http://www.happinessplunge.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/20111228-DSC06592-2.jpg

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 29, 2013 at 4:55 pm

Thanks, Adam. Having met quite a few Venezuelans who have left Venezuela because of the Revolution, it’s clear that one universal fact about revolutions is that by definition, there are winners and losers — and the winners write the history.

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avatar Suzanne (Travelbunny) June 29, 2013 at 6:34 pm

The first meal I ever had in Canada was in Toronto in the revolving restaurant at the top of the CN Tower. http://www.flickr.com/photos/14870023@N02/1544033043/

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 30, 2013 at 5:27 pm

I got dizzy just standing on the ground and looking up at the CN Tower in Toronto. So, I wimped out and passed on visiting the observation deck. I am ashamed.

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avatar Linda ~ Journey Jottings June 30, 2013 at 1:04 am

Revolutions make me think of superpowers and what could be more super-powerful than a super-moon (which we recently experienced) and, which is definitely more my kind of revolutionary model.

http://140735925.r.worldcdn.net/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Moon_527.jpg
(Added the photo I recently took to an old post about Blue Moons – http://journeyjottings.com/blog/2010/03/blue-moon/ – so as to get you the link!)

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 30, 2013 at 5:28 pm

The Mayans and Aztecs (and all sorts of other civilizations and cultures) certainly believe(d) that the moon was revolutionary — no reason you can’t 😉

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avatar Irene S. Levine June 30, 2013 at 1:48 pm
Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 30, 2013 at 5:30 pm

What is it about France? My revolving carousel photo (above) was from Honfleur, France on the Normandy coast. I think the French people were so traumatized by the excesses of the French Revolution, that they have settled on the revolving kind for children ever since.

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avatar Charli | Wanderlusters June 30, 2013 at 6:23 pm

The scars of the Nicaraguan Revolution are still visible on the streets of Granada however during our visit we captured a shot which juxtaposed any concept of violence and revolt. A little girl day dreaming by the fountain in the Parque Colon – Aquí no se rinde nadie ‘Here no one surrenders’.

http://wanderlusters.co.uk/wp-content/gallery/nicaragua/littlegirl-mainsquare-granada-nicaragua.jpg

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 30, 2013 at 10:52 pm

I did a little reading about the slogan, “Aquí no se rinde nadie”. Apparently, during the revolution, it was stenciled all over Granada. Now, children can once again day dream in Nicaragua. Would that they could everywhere. (Ojala que pudieran en todo el mundo.) (Anyone who speaks Spanish, please chime in and correct my translation of my last sentence—-BTW, I know there should be an accent over the a in “Ojala”. I just don’t know how to put one in on my keyboard.) Thanks for submitting, Charli.

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avatar Vanessa (@Turnipseeds) June 30, 2013 at 10:39 pm

Masks and puppets from the Bread and Puppet Theater of New York City, circa 1963. Now housed in a barn-turned-museum in Northern Vermont, these dramatic puppets revolutionized theater as they spoke to revolution, protest, and politics and were a key part of the anti-Vietnam War movement.

http://www.turnipseedtravel.com/uploads/1/5/9/2/15922294/2814039.jpg?254

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr June 30, 2013 at 11:45 pm

Thanks for your submission, Vanessa. As a Baby Boomer, the Viet Nam War and the anti-war movement it spawned in the United States weren’t history for me. They were current events.

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avatar Bethaney - Flashpacker Family July 1, 2013 at 12:55 am

Here’s my submission Suzanne:

http://flashpackerfamily.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/348_37391581127_2557_n.jpg

A graffiti art statement on the hypocrisy of war, found in Hoi An, Vietnam, a country that knows revolution all to well.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 1, 2013 at 11:39 am

What’s especially interesting with this Viet Namese graffiti is that the figure is obviously Japanese. I would have thought some US symbol would have been used in political graffiti about the scourge of militarism. I think southeast Asians still sort of feel towards the Japanese as many Jews still do towards Germany — a lingering resentment while their grandparents who suffered so much through World War II and the years preceding it at the hands of a particular enemy are still alive.

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avatar Sam July 1, 2013 at 5:33 am

We were in Prague a few days after the passing Václav Havel in 2011 and the country was in a state of great mourning. The beloved Havel had candlelight vigils erected in his honour all over the city to commemorate his achievements as the leader of the velvet revolution and one of the founders of the pro-democracy movement in Eastern Europe. There were large, official posters and banners all over the city but in one side street we saw this piece of graffiti completely surrounded on the ground by red candles and it caught our full attention. I thought this picture really captured this rounds theme of revolution – how just one man could start a revolution that would ultimately lead to the fall of the Berlin wall – one of the biggest revolutions in recent European history.

http://foodtravelbliss.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Vaclav-Havel.jpg

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avatar Andrew July 1, 2013 at 6:07 am

Seeing this all over Europe these days – mostly peaceful, but sometimes not…

http://www.ark3.com/2013/05/scenes-from-madrid-austerity-protests/s_street-may-13/

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 1, 2013 at 11:56 am

It is disconcerting to see these images in a democracy — faceless dark riot police at the ready.

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avatar Ali July 1, 2013 at 11:45 am

So many good ones, but my vote is for Jaime’s (Breakaway Backpacker) because it’s such an incredible photo!

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avatar TheGirl July 1, 2013 at 7:23 pm

I definitely love the grafitti art from Vietnam. It is such an iconic image, so the way they express the hipocrasy of Japanese culture — peace and war..is there a balance? Well if you look at their history, you’d probably see more blood.

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avatar Kris July 2, 2013 at 12:22 am

First off…FANTASTIC theme. Well timed, not only for the States but for many spots around the world. With that said, I’m going with a photo that isn’t my best “revolution” photo, but I think it’s uber-timely because the Fourth marks victory in the first American revolution and the turning point of the second with victory in Vicksburg and Gettysburg. I shot this photo while on assignment at Gettysburg a couple of days ago. It’s the point where the Confederacy was literally turned back for good. Some people call it the high water mark of the South…others remember it as Pickett’s charge, but it was the moment that the war for America’s second revolution was turned for the Union in my native Pennsylvania.

http://i1.wp.com/theworldisourdistrict.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Gettysburg_13.jpg

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 2, 2013 at 12:54 am

Kris, thanks for drawing the parallel between the July 4th, 1776 and July 4th, 1863. Had the Union troops not been successful in defeating General Robert E. Lee and his Confederate forces during three sweltering days of battle from July 1st through July 3rd, 1863, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 4th might indeed be a day for celebrating a successful revolution — in the Confederate States of America. (I’m a Pennsylvanian as well (born and raised in Philadelphia). Walking around the Gettysburg battlefield these many years later, it is still possible to feel that one is treading on hallowed ground.

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avatar Kristin Addis July 2, 2013 at 1:35 am

The call for a revolution: these beautiful guys. Found only in Borneo and Sumatra, Orangutans are threatened by growing palm oil plantations, most of which are not even owned by the locals in these areas. What’s worse, the burnings lately have created a smokey existence. A revolution is needed to keep them around.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/avaapollo/9162303715/

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 2, 2013 at 10:16 pm

Thanks for your submission Kristin. I believe this is the only contribution that called for a revolution. (BTW, Kristin has amazing monkey/primate photos on her Flickr account.)

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avatar Dani | Globetrottergirls July 2, 2013 at 4:12 am

We came across this Karl Marx street art in Lisbon. Portugal. With the word Revolução, it seems that socialist/communist belief system is making a comeback in some circles in Portugal, a country hard hit by the financial crisis – a purely capitalist creation.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/globetrottergirls/6740878143/

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 2, 2013 at 10:19 pm

I’m not sure that pure-ish Marxism will ever gain much traction again in Europe since the demise of the Soviet Union. However, uttering the word “socialism” doesn’t set peoples’s hair on fire the way it does for some folks here in the US of A.

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avatar Jessica July 2, 2013 at 5:52 am

Naked Revolution: The Naked Bike ride takes place in London and in cities around the world each year in order to protest Oil Dependency. Speeding nude down city streets is certainly one way to grab some serious attention for the cause!
http://whatshotuk.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/London-Naked-Revolution-Against-Oil-Dependency.jpg

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 2, 2013 at 10:21 pm

I hope Google doesn’t flag me for posting this. Probably there aren’t too many minors trolling the internet looking for the key words “Baby Boomer” so maybe they’ll let it slip by. 😉

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avatar Mary Slagel July 2, 2013 at 11:05 am

I really like submission #6. It sparked my curiosity too and made me want to know the whole story. The picture was also full of power and emotion. I have seen mass prayer while traveling and there is always something so moving about it. Seeing so many bodies on their knees praying in public is humbling especially for what it stood for.

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avatar Dale July 2, 2013 at 4:57 pm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/angloitalianfollowus/8127342138/sizes/m/in/set-72157631863331716/

Bit late to the party, but hope I’m not too late.

I guess I should count myself lucky that I’ve never needed to be part of a social revolution within my home country or whilst in any countries I’ve visited. The only memory recall I have when I think of ‘revolution’ is from some photos Franca and I took whilst in Kobe, Japan where at night the whole bay is up in lights.

The one picture that sprang to mind first was of the ferris wheel with it’s lights flashing in sequence and timed just right it looked just like a revolving swirling line of light.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 2, 2013 at 10:23 pm

Dale, thanks for the submission. The party could never end before you showed up. This is a great representation of the “other” kind of revolution. I think you really caught the essence of the word with this photo, including the movement aspect.

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avatar Debra Yearwood July 2, 2013 at 7:43 pm

Wow, so many of these images are so powerful and those that are not are still quite arresting. What an amazing collection of images and obviously a very inspiring choice of themes.

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avatar Susan Cooper July 3, 2013 at 8:23 pm

First I’m sorry that yours was chosen as the cheesiest.

The ones that moved to most were the Argentine lost souls, the Velvet Revolution one. the ruth is they are all amazing had have a message, be it beautiful or not. That is the beauty of photographs they say so much with no words. I guess what I’m saying is I loved them all for very different reason. 🙂

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 3, 2013 at 9:45 pm

Thanks for your comment, Susan. Welcome to my happy predicament.

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avatar Carole Terwilliger Meyers July 4, 2013 at 11:57 am

I want to enter but it is 8:55am PST on July 4, so I am going to just miss this. I’ve been away for a while and just returned, so that is the delay. Anyway, I don’t have a link to the photo I want to submit and there is no time to ask if you’ll accept an attachment so I’d like to suggest that in future that question be addressed in the directions. Also, it wasn’t clear to me if just an image works as an entry or whether it needs to be in an existing blog post (thus the link to it).

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avatar Tom Bartel July 4, 2013 at 4:25 pm

http://travelpast50.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/mural-bogside-derry-northern-ireland-2.jpg
Spent our Independence Day taking a tour of the Bogside area of Derry, Northern Ireland. The sectarian violence only ended here a very few years ago, and the British only got around to admitting they were wrong for killing 13 unarmed civilians on Bloody Sunday 1972 in 2010. But things are getting better here, despite the frequent reminders like this one of days when the people here rose up against the British like we did in 1776.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 5, 2013 at 8:47 am

Tom, thanks for your contribution. The British certainly had a way of overstaying their “welcome”, and then, eventually, some excesses are forgiven if not forgotten. We visited the Republic of Ireland last year. I didn’t have a good handle on the Irish antipathy towards the British until I soaked up some of the history there. To summarize and greatly oversimplify, Oliver Cromwell was not a nice man. Yet, the Queen of England visited Dublin in 2011, dressed in a green suit (and hat, of course) and was more or less warmly welcomed.

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avatar bermtopia July 4, 2013 at 5:48 pm

Hmmm. Let me try this again.

LAS VEGAS: Round and round you go, where you’ll stop, you never know

http://www.flickr.com/photos/47823320@N04/9201490842/

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avatar Marcia July 4, 2013 at 11:59 pm
avatar Bermtopia July 5, 2013 at 8:59 am

After really liking at these grt photos, I’m really struck by #6 from Santa Fe Traveler. The back story and image are compelling and thought-provoking especially with this week’s developments in the Middle East.

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avatar Suzanne Fluhr (Just One Boomer) July 5, 2013 at 11:25 am

#6 is from Breakaway Backpacker. Each photo is under its # and explanation.

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avatar Cathy Sweeney July 5, 2013 at 5:09 pm

Excellent choices — no way I could pick a favorite. I love the diversity of subjects, too. I’m sorry to admit that I didn’t see the memorial in Prague that Gypsy Nesters posted. Maybe there too many people around Wenceslas Square at the time. Next time I’ll look more closely.

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avatar Kristin July 5, 2013 at 6:36 pm

I’ll cast a vote for #25 from Derry (by Tom@travelpast50.com) because I was there when he took the photo, and because I was so moved by the tour of “Bog Side” (or “Free Derry”) in Northern Ireland–where so many suffered for so many years. They had no rights to vote, no way to get jobs, and ultimately no answer to the internments without charges or trials. Bloody Sunday and the hunger strikes (remember Bobby Sands?) are living memories for me. But everyone in Derry seems to be putting it firmly in the past. Distant memories, they say, as they cross their fingers.

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Suzanne Fluhr Suzanne Fluhr July 6, 2013 at 4:20 pm

Living history.

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avatar Becc July 7, 2013 at 9:10 pm

There are certainly some fabulous shots in there. It will be hard to pick a winner I am sure.

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